Neva Hill

Neva Hill is in her 16th year as a political commentator for KOSU.

Hill been professionally active in Oklahoma Republican politics and journalism for 30 years. She is the owner and president of Neva Hill & Company, a full-service political consulting and public relations firm located in south Oklahoma City. Currently, Hill is a consultant to a number of federal, statewide, county, and legislative officeholders across Oklahoma. She has also been a political analyst for OETA-TV election night coverage the last four years.

She was also the publisher and editor of The Hill Report, an insider’s report on Oklahoma politics and government which ended 26 years of weekly print publication when it was sold to an online political newsletter owned by Mike McCarville in the fall of 2006. 

In 2004, she was named one of three Oklahoma women to serve on the National Steering Committee for “W Stands for Women” – along with then-Lt. Governor Mary Fallin and Terry Neese, president of Women Impacting Public Policy. In 1992, Neva served as State Director of the Bush-Quayle campaign.

Hill served as Assistant Commissioner of Labor for the State of Oklahoma in 1987 under Governor Henry Bellmon. The following year she managed the successful state senate campaign for Tom Cole, who now represents Oklahoma’s Fourth District in the United States Congress.

Ways to Connect

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill about Attorney General Mike Hunter filing a lawsuit against major opioid distributors in the state, the governor's task force on corrections reform releases its report while also asking for more time to come up with detailed plans to reduce the state's prison population and two initiative petitions to make recreational marijuana legal in the state are getting push back from the state's medical marijuana industry.

 

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and, sitting in for Ryan Kiesel, ACLU Oklahoma Director of Policy and Advocacy Nicole McAfee about the impasse between the governor and the tribes over gaming compacts which now looks headed to court, dueling ballot initiatives to legalize recreational marijuana are getting ready for voter signatures, while medical marijuana provided the state with an additional $55M in its first full year on the books.

 

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about a petition filed to allow voters to add recreational marijuana to the state constitution, the battle between Governor Stitt and tribal leaders over gaming compacts heats up as the end of the year gets closer and Oklahoma City Democratic Representative Shane Stone delays his resignation by one daym removing the need for a special election.

 

  

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the passage of MAPS4 by a wide margin garnering more than 70% of those voting, the Pardon and Parole Board sees a 118% increase in the number of docketed cases with commutations jumping 426% since 2018 and Governor Stitt gives an extension to his criminal justice reform task force.

 

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the resignation announcement by Oklahoma City Democratic Representative Shane Stone which could trigger a special election and voters are heading to the polls this Tuesday to decide on MAPS 4 to raise nearly $978M for 16 different projects.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about Governor Stitt's suggestion for Oklahoma to use Medicaid block grants rather than going with Medicaid expansion, an initiative petition to end certain sentencing enhancements for nonviolent offenses and the State Insurance Commissioner chooses to not enforce a law giving patients the right to choose a pharmacy provider.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the commutation of more than 500 prisoners in state custody, the concerns growing from law enforcement and citizens over permitless carry and the State Supreme Court listening to the challenge of a controversial alcohol distribution law.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about a push to change the way Oklahomans draw political districts by putting it in the hands of an independent committee rather than politicians, the Oklahoma County Sheriff plans to hand over control of the jail to a newly formed trust whether it's ready or not and the attorney general meets with tribal leaders to discuss gaming compacts.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the Oklahoma Health Care Authority proposal to hire a Medicaid consultant to help the governor with his health care plan, the supporters of Yes on 802 to get Medicaid Expansion on the ballot file their petitions with the Secretary of State's office and House Speaker Charles McCall wants more oversight of state agencies by getting lawmakers to attend 40 state boards and commissions.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Director of Policy and Advocacy Nicole McAfee (who is sitting in for Ryan Kiesel) about the Legislative Compensation Board giving legislators a 35% pay raise to $47,000 a year, the Oklahoma Supreme Court rejecting a constitutional challenge against MAPS 4 and the state Republican Party is facing financial issues along with disputes from within its own party.

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