Michael Cross

Morning Edition host

Michael Cross has been with KOSU since 2008, working as the state capitol bureau chief for seven years, as well as KOSU's student coordinator.  While he still keeps up with the capitol and does some reporting, his roles have changed.  As of October 2014, he's now the host of KOSU's Morning Edition.

He came to KOSU after several years in broadcast media, working at KTOK, KOKH Fox 25, KOCO Channel 5 and KWTV News 9. Michael has his degree in Broadcasting and Journalism from the University of Central Oklahoma as well as an Associates in Theatre Arts from Oklahoma City Community College. One of his hobbies includes performing on the stage having spent time with Oklahoma Shakespeare in the Park dating back to 1989.

Ways to Connect

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about Epic Virtual Charter School calling for an investigation of State Senator Ron Sharp over "defamation" of the institution, Oklahoma still ranks second in the number of uninsured people in the state and more people are getting recommendation for commutations and paroles.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU' Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the decision by the Secretary of State's office to move forward with counting signatures on a petition to stop permitless carry, rather than waiting on a ruling from the State Supreme Court.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the ruling by a Cleveland County district judge awarding the state $572 million in its opioid lawsuit, supporters of a petition to stop permitless carry hope to gather enough signatures to get State Question 803 on the 2020 ballot and the Oklahoma City Council unanimously passes MAPS 4 and sends it to voters on December 10th.

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The lawmaker behind a petition to stop permitless carry from taking effect November 1 says he’s optimistic about having enough signatures.

State Representative Jason Lowe says supporters are circulating more than 4,000 petitions, which could possibly generate 76,000 signatures.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and sitting in for Ryan Kiesel is ACLU Oklahoma Director of Policy and Advocacy Nicole McAfee. They discuss the call by Governor Stitt to remove Glen Johnson as Higher Education Chancellor, a claim by QuikTrip of an increase in property thefts since State Question 780 was passed by voters and the Cherokee Tribe pointing to a nearly 200 year old treaty in calling for representation in Congress.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about an attempt to stop a permitless carry law taking effect by November 1st, an alcohol distribution law getting ruled unconstitutional and Medicaid Expansion supporters working to gather nearly 178,000 signatures to get the proposition before voters in 2020.

Oklahoma transportation officials are closely watching a funding bill moving through Congress.

The measure by Senator Jim Inhofe has the potential to bring the Oklahoma Department of Transportation $4.2 billion dollars over five years – an increase of $100 million more than 2015.

ODOT Director Tim Gatz says there’s even more to the bill for Oklahomans to celebrate.

Volunteers hoping to put Medicaid Expansion on the ballot face a 90-day challenge to get nearly 178,000 signatures.

After getting a quick five-minute tutorial on how to legally gather signatures, Norman resident Jared Deck signed his name on the petition to put State Question 802 up for a vote of the people.

The Custer County native says he was born in a hospital building that is vacant today and has been for the past 20 years.

Flickr / Robert Couse-Baker

A new law taking effect this week cracks down on stalled trains at intersections.

Under House Bill 2472, local officials can issue a fine of up to $1,000 if a train blocks traffic with a public highway or street for more than ten minutes.

Davis Police Chief Dan Cooper says a stalled train on Highway 7 recently meant his officers took 20 minutes to respond to a call two and a half blocks from his police station.

  

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the first anniversary of medical marijuana and Oklahoma already near the top nationwide in patient participation, Senator Inhofe vows to crack down on the private company reportedly leaving military families in disrepaired and dangerous homes at Tinker and other bases in the U.S. and the State Supreme Court refuses to hear a controversial alcohol bill preferring to send it to Oklahoma County District Court.

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