Michael Cross

Morning Edition Host

Michael Cross has been with KOSU since 2008, working as the state capitol bureau chief for seven years, as well as KOSU's student coordinator.  While he still keeps up with the capitol and does some reporting, his roles have changed.  As of October 2014, he's now the host of KOSU's Morning Edition.

He came to KOSU after several years in broadcast media, working at KTOK, KOKH Fox 25, KOCO Channel 5 and KWTV News 9. Michael has his degree in Broadcasting and Journalism from the University of Central Oklahoma as well as an Associates in Theatre Arts from Oklahoma City Community College. One of his hobbies includes performing on the stage having spent time with Oklahoma Shakespeare in the Park dating back to 1989.

Ways to Connect

Mairead Todd / KOSU

KOSU is covering the coronavirus in Oklahoma and how it's affecting our lives. Bookmark this page for the latest updates.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and Civil Rights Attorney Ryan Kiesel about a new policy from Governor Stitt allowing students exposed to COVID-19 to not be quarantined if they were wearing a mask and social distancing, officials at the State Capitol stepping up security ahead of Joe Biden's inauguration and some Tulsa black leaders asking for Senator James Lankford to be removed from the 1921 Race Massacre Commission.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and Civil Rights Attorney Ryan Kiesel talk about President Trump supporters storming the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday, Oklahoma health officials are moving into phase two of the coronavirus vaccine and releasing a mobile phone app to help people get appointments and lawmakers hold Organizational Day to get ready for the Legislative Session starting in February while dismissing a rule for lawmakers to wear masks.

Local headlines for Wednesday, January 6, 2021:

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Governor Kevin Stitt is calling on travelers to come to Oklahoma.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and Civil Rights Attorney Ryan Kiesel about new restrictions by Governor Kevin Stitt in the hopes of reducing the spread of COVID-19 and Oklahoma's seven electors cast their vote for President Donald Trump while the governor acknowledges Joe Biden did win the overall election nationwide.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and Civil Rights Attorney Ryan Kiesel about Oklahoma Attorney General Mike Hunter joining a Texas lawsuit to overturn votes in four states won by President-elect Joe Biden and Governor Stitt rescinds the nomination of an anti-mask advocate for the State Board of Education.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and Civil Rights Attorney Ryan Kiesel about Oklahoma City ending its enforcement of restaurants and bars staying open after 11 p.m., Governor Stitt announcing special election dates for the seat held by Congresswoman-elect Stephanie Bice and a law to keep trains from stopping for more than ten minutes at street crossings getting declared unconstitutional.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Civil Rights Attorney Ryan Kiesel and former House Speaker Kris Steele about Governor Stitt's restrictions on bars and restaurants and mask requirement for state employees and in state buildings to curb the spread of COVID-19 as well as Stitt's firing the president of the Virtual Charter School Board as he was investigating Epic Virtual Charter School.

Ryan LaCroix / KOSU

A growing number of Tulsa suburbs are adding face covering ordinances.

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