Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Champion Of Gender Equality, Dies At 87

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the demure firebrand who in her 80s became a legal, cultural and feminist icon, died Friday. The Supreme Court announced her death, saying the cause was complications from metastatic cancer of the pancreas. The court, in a statement, said Ginsburg died at her home in Washington, D.C., surrounded by family. She was 87. "Our nation has lost a justice of historic stature," Chief Justice John Roberts said. "We at the Supreme Court have lost a cherished colleague....

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Coronavirus In Oklahoma: The Latest

KOSU is covering the coronavirus in Oklahoma and how it's affecting our lives. Bookmark this page for the latest updates.

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More Than 240 School Districts In Oklahoma Are Reporting COVID-19 Cases

Nobody knows how many cases of the coronavirus are present in Oklahoma schools. But, we do know there are hundreds of cases in every part of the state.

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Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the demure firebrand who in her 80s became a legal, cultural and feminist icon, died Friday. The Supreme Court announced her death, saying the cause was complications from metastatic cancer of the pancreas.

The court, in a statement, said Ginsburg died at her home in Washington, D.C., surrounded by family. She was 87.

kiowatribe.org

Kiowa Legislator Angela Chaddlesone McCarthy passed away on Thursday.

McCarthy was diagnosed with COVID-19 at the beginning of August. According to posts on her Facebook page, she was in the intensive care unit at Deaconess Integris Hospital in Oklahoma City. McCarthy's condition deteriorated and in the last few weeks she was put on a ventilator. She passed away late Thursday afternoon.

Seth Bodine / KOSU

As U.S. Census Bureau director Steven Dillingham visited a mobile questionnaire assistance site in front of the Oklahoma capitol building on Friday, he announced the bureau will be sending an additional 130 enumerators from different states to help with Oklahoma’s efforts.

The state is about 90% enumerated, but Dillingham said there’s still a lot of work to do in order to get close to 100%.

Chelsea Stanfield / KOSU

KOSU is covering the coronavirus in Oklahoma and how it's affecting our lives. Bookmark this page for the latest updates.

Oklahoma health officials reported nine new deaths on Friday, bringing the state's total to 939. They are as follows:

The Bureau of Indian Affairs Office of Tribal Justice Support awarded the Muscogee (Creek) Nation $547,980 in grant money to provide more staff and services for its tribal court system.

The money will be used to hire four additional prosecutors to handle cases involving domestic violence, protective orders and other cases that relate to the Violence Against Women Act. 

The grant will also be used to update tribal criminal codes and buy more equipment. Tribal codes needing an update include traffic, youthful offenders, criminal offenses and criminal procedures.

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Nobody knows how many cases of the coronavirus are present in Oklahoma schools. But, we do know there are hundreds of cases in every part of the state.

The mother of Breonna Taylor says that if the police reforms announced this week by officials in Louisville were in place six months ago, her daughter might still be alive.

Taylor, a 26-year-old Black woman who worked as an emergency room technician, was fatally shot by Louisville police during a botched narcotics raid at her home during the early morning hours of March 13.

A decision on whether to bring charges against the three officers who carried out the raid is expected in the coming days.

Updated at 2:41 p.m. ET

The Trump administration is banning Americans from downloading popular video-sharing app TikTok and limiting the use of WeChat because of national security concerns, the Commerce Department announced on Friday.

As of midnight on Sunday, TikTok will also not be able to receive system updates, which could affect its functionality, including slowing down the app, but the app's current version will still work for American users. Over time, however, TikTok may stop working altogether.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about a criminal justice reform group calling on Governor Kevin Stitt and the Department of Corrections to take steps to stem the spread of COVID-19, Tulsa City Council unanimously approved a new Hate Crimes ordinance to include sexual orientation and gender identity and the state Supreme Court denies Stitt's request for a rehearing on its decision over tribal gaming compacts.

 

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Election season is here. We are witnessing a very unconventional 2020 presidential race, and many local and state elections are in full swing. All the while, we are STILL in the midst of a global pandemic. Racial injustice protests continue to dot the American landscape. And our volatile economy struggles to rebound. These are troubling times.

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