Michael Cross

Morning Edition host

Michael Cross has been with KOSU since 2008, working as the state capitol bureau chief for seven years, as well as KOSU's student coordinator.  While he still keeps up with the capitol and does some reporting, his roles have changed.  As of October 2014, he's now the host of KOSU's Morning Edition.

He came to KOSU after several years in broadcast media, working at KTOK, KOKH Fox 25, KOCO Channel 5 and KWTV News 9. Michael has his degree in Broadcasting and Journalism from the University of Central Oklahoma as well as an Associates in Theatre Arts from Oklahoma City Community College. One of his hobbies includes performing on the stage having spent time with Oklahoma Shakespeare in the Park dating back to 1989.

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Nathan Rott / NPR

Early estimates for repairs to roads and bridges from May storms are coming in at $2 million.

Transportation Secretary Tim Gatz says he expects those numbers to rise as crews run conditional assessments and the cost could rise to $10 million.

facebook.com/RepKendraHorn

Oklahoma’s newest representative to Congress is working to help people and reach across the aisle to create meaningful legislation - a task not always easy in today’s partisan atmosphere.

KOSU’s Michael Cross got a chance to sit down with District 5 Democratic Congresswoman Kendra Horn to look at her first six months in office.

Congresswoman Horn says she is available to help anyone with issues from federal agencies. You can contact her on her Congressional website at horn.house.gov.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill about the opioid trial starting in Norman which has grabbed national and international attention and state lawmakers end the 2019 legislative session a week earlier than required by the Constitution.

The trio also discusses some of the bills signed recently by Governor Stitt.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about a bill signed by Governor Stitt which he had originally vetoed giving patients the right to choose their own pharmacy provider and lawmakers pass a measure putting restrictions on the powers of the Attorney General over settlements.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about a final agreement on a budget between legislative leaders and Governor Stitt and the Oklahoma Council of Public Affairs, a conservative think tank, levels a constitutional challenge against an initiative petition to put Medicaid expansion before voters on the 2020 ballot.

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Special Olympics is celebrating 50 years in Oklahoma with the Summer Games running through Friday in Stillwater.

Organizers expect about 5,500 athletes to take part in the games, which began at the University of Tulsa in 1969 with only track and field events.

Games Director Jim Scott says now in its 36th year in Stillwater, events are spread all over the city with the busiest day coming Thursday.

oksenate.gov

A Senate panel has advanced Governor Kevin Stitt’s nominee for Secretary of the Budget.

The process was halted last week after a fiery debate in the Senate Appropriations Committee, but, on Monday, members voted unanimously to support Mike Mazzei for the job.

Part of the contention last week involved worries the new governor was telling agencies not to talk to lawmakers, but Mazzei immediately calmed concerns in his opening statement.

Flickr / Marco Verch

A new law cracks down on giving antipsychotic drugs to patients in nursing homes in Oklahoma.

Senate Bill 142, signed by Governor Kevin Stitt last week, requires informed consent for nursing home patients and their families regarding the use of powerful antipsychotic drugs.

The bill’s author, Senator Stephanie Bice, says Oklahoma ranks as the worst state in the nation when it comes to the use of antipsychotics on nursing home patients with no psychiatric diagnosis.

Ryan LaCroix / KOSU

Oklahoma lawmakers are facing a deadline to finish their work in the next three weeks.

The most important duty before the 2019 legislature ends is crafting a budget for the 2020 fiscal year, which starts on July 1. But, so far, nothing has been released.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about a row in a Senate committee over a gubernatorial nomination for Finance Secretary as worry grows concerning executive power over state agencies, criminal justice advocates worry about a former corrections reform opponent working on Stitt's team and the House opens an investigation against a Republican lawmakers leveled by the co-founder of the Sooner Tea Party.

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