Kateleigh Mills

Special Projects Reporter

Kateleigh Mills returned to KOSU in December 2019 as Special Projects Reporter, following a year-long stint at KWBU in Waco, Texas.

Previously, Mills was a news assistant and All Things Considered host for KOSU from March to December 2018.

She completed her undergraduate degree at the University of Central Oklahoma in December 2017. While studying journalism and professional media, she worked with the UCO’s journalism staff to reinvent the campus newspaper for a more multimedia purpose – joining with the campus radio and television stations for news updates and hosting public forums with campus groups.

The Edmond-raised reporter was editor-in- chief of her college newspaper when it won the Society of Professional Journalism award for Best Newspaper in Category B. Mills also received the Oklahoma Press Association Award for ‘Outstanding Promise in Journalism’ at the Oklahoma Journalism Hall of Fame event in 2017. She is also the Oklahoma Collegiate Media Association's recipient for 'College Newspaper Journalist of the Year' in 2017.

Ways to Connect

Jenny Mae Harms / KOSU

KOSU is continuing to cover the developing story around coronavirus in Oklahoma. Bookmark this page for the latest updates.

Mairead Todd / KOSU

Oklahoma becomes the 37th state to expand Medicaid, Stephanie Bice and Terry Neese advance to Congressional District 5 Republican runoff, and more than half of Oklahoma legislative races are now decided.

Photo Provided

Jennifer Thomas is a 36-year-old, self-employed, Black woman living in Tulsa, Oklahoma. In her audio diary for KOSU, the Detroit-native discusses her fears and thankfulness for those around her as she waits for the results from the COVID-19 test she had on June 26.

Four Oklahomans Share Thoughts About Tulsa Events This Weekend

Jun 19, 2020
Jessica Dickerson

A mixture of emotion ranging from delight and celebration to fear and anger are converging in downtown Tulsa this weekend. Here are just a few of the people who plan to attend or support the first campaign rally for President Donald Trump in four months, celebrations for Juneteenth and protests.  

Photo provided

Avery Marshall is a black trans man living and working in Tulsa. In the past several months, he has gone through a lot of changes - working from home with his fiancé, postponing their wedding over COVID-19 concerns and recovering from top surgery. In his audio diary, Avery talks about the worries he has even in his regular tasks – like walking his dog, Chugg – and also how he feels about this particular Pride Month.


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Liz Fletcher's husband has cystic fibrosis, so she was already being precautious when out in public before the COVID-19 pandemic. In her audio diary for KOSU, Fletcher, who is a psychotherapist, says she's worried about when she may have to return to work in-person and what that could mean for the health of her husband and her patients. 


Element5 Digital / Unsplash

KOSU has been answering questions from our listening and texting club communities about the June 30th primary - where Oklahoma will hold elections for state legislators, Congressional seats and whether or not to expand Medicaid. 

Photo Provided

Following the recent killings of Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor and George Floyd, north Tulsa resident Sondra Slade and her family are having talks about being black in America. In her audio diary for KOSU, Slade talks about her worries as a parent and how these events are affecting her kids. 


Dan Dennis / Unsplash

The deadline to register to vote for the June primary elections in Oklahoma is this Friday, June 5.

The election on June 30 will be held for state legislators, Congressional seats and whether or not to expand Medicaid. Oklahomans can find voter registration applications online at elections.ok.gov or pick one up at county election boards, post offices, tag agencies or libraries.

Photo Provided

RJ Young no longer considers COVID-19 as the biggest threat to his health. As a millennial black man living in Tulsa, he says racism has – yet again – become the greatest threat to his well-being. In his audio diary, Young talks about the latest Black Lives Matter protests and how he is terrified to be a black man living in the city that, nearly a century ago, was the site of one of the worst acts of racial violence. 

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