Robby Korth

Education Reporter

Robby Korth joined StateImpact Oklahoma in October 2019, focusing on education reporting.

He grew up in Ardmore, Oklahoma and Fayetteville, Arkansas, and graduated from the University of Nebraska with a Journalism degree.

Robby has reported for several newspapers, most recently covering higher education and other topics for The Roanoke Times in southwest Virginia. While there, he co-created the podcast Septic, spending a year reporting on the story of a missing five-year-old boy, the discovery of his body in a septic tank a few days after his disappearance, and the subsequent court trial of his mother. Although the story was of particular interest to residents in Virginia, the podcast gained a larger audience and was named as a New and Noteworthy podcast by Apple Podcasts.

On a personal note, Robby loves trivia games and won his elementary school's geography bee in fifth grade.

Ways to Connect

Ryan LaCroix / KOSU

KOSU is covering the coronavirus in Oklahoma and how it's affecting our lives. Bookmark this page for the latest updates.

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A lawsuit filed by a group of concerned Stillwater Public Schools' parents was quietly dismissed at the end of March.

Robby Korth / StateImpact Oklahoma

Backlash is mounting toward a resolution passed by Oklahoma’s State Board of Education to equalize funding for charter and traditional public schools.

Jenny Mae Harms / KOSU

Jake Merrick won the Senate seat once held by Stephanie Bice and several newcomers won city council posts in Oklahoma City, Norman Stillwater and Broken Arrow.

Sharon McCutcheon / Unsplash

Oklahoma City Public Schools has taken legal action to halt a controversial Oklahoma State Board of Education policy to equalize funding of charter and traditional public schools. The injunction is designed to stop some state and local tax revenues from going to charters.

Emily Wendler / StateImpact Oklahoma

A recent resolution announced by Oklahoma’s State Board of Education will transform education funding in Oklahoma by equalizing funding for charter and traditional public schools.

Joshua Hoehne / Unsplash

Oklahoma City Public Schools predicts it will lose millions of dollars after the State Board of Education abruptly adopted a resolution last week to equally fund traditional public and charter schools.

Taylor Wilcox / Unsplash

After convening for hours in a closed meeting on Thursday, Oklahoma’s State Board of Education flipped public school funding on its head.

The board voted 4-3 on a resolution to “equalize funding for all charter schools and public schools.”

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Tulsa Public Schools administrators and a student appeared on a national stage on Wednesday to talk about the district’s approach to coming back to school.

Quinton Chandler / StateImpact Oklahoma

Epic Charter Schools missed a state deadline to pay an $11.2 million fine handed down to the school in October. Repayment will be discussed at Thursday's State Board of Education meeting.

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