Robby Korth

Education Reporter

Robby Korth joined StateImpact Oklahoma in October 2019, focusing on education reporting.

He grew up in Ardmore, Oklahoma and Fayetteville, Arkansas, and graduated from the University of Nebraska with a Journalism degree.

Robby has reported for several newspapers, most recently covering higher education and other topics for The Roanoke Times in southwest Virginia. While there, he co-created the podcast Septic, spending a year reporting on the story of a missing five-year-old boy, the discovery of his body in a septic tank a few days after his disappearance, and the subsequent court trial of his mother. Although the story was of particular interest to residents in Virginia, the podcast gained a larger audience and was named as a New and Noteworthy podcast by Apple Podcasts.

On a personal note, Robby loves trivia games and won his elementary school's geography bee in fifth grade.

Ways to Connect

Facebook

Summer camps across Oklahoma are going to look different this year. COVID-19 is forcing camps to cancel, go digital or take extreme measures to keep campers safe.

The state’s reopening plan said summer camps could begin June 1, but the decision to open this summer has weighed heavily on Tom Graney, the executive director of New Life Ranch in Colcord, Okla.

"We’ve had lots of agonizing, frustrating, stimulating conversations and debate about... so we’ve got the OK, but does that mean we do it?," Graney said.

Mairead Todd / KOSU

KOSU is continuing to cover the developing story around coronavirus in Oklahoma. Bookmark this page for the latest updates.

A photo of a child playing with car toys.
Sandy Millar / Unsplash

Childcare centers across Oklahoma are slowly starting to reopen after the coronavirus forced many to close.

More than 650 out of almost 3,000 childcare centers statewide are temporarily closed because of challenges created by the coronavirus.

A Department of Human Services spokeswoman says those shuttered centers could serve as many as 35,000 children.

Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

The body that oversees high school sports narrowly voted Friday to not approve rules to phase in summer activities.

The Oklahoma Secondary School Activities Association board of directors voted 7-6 Friday to reject a proposed plan that would have eased into high school sport summer activities.

The rejection paves the way for schools to begin hosting sporting clinic and camps the first week of June as long as there aren’t any superseding local or state restrictions.

Johnny McClung / Unsplash

Oklahoma will now screen for dyslexia, the most common learning disability.

House Bill 2804 was signed by Governor Kevin Stitt on Tuesday. The measure will require dyslexia screening for students reading below grade level in kindergarten through third grade.

Screenshot

Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt laid out a timeline for local governments to start getting payments from the federal CARES Act at a press conference Wednesday afternoon.

CARES Act funds totalling $1.2 billion will be dispersed to local governments throughout Oklahoma.

Stillwater Police

Alberto Morejon, a leader of the 2018 state teacher walkout, was arrested Tuesday for making lewd proposals to a minor.

The social studies teacher from Stillwater was arrested for sending sexual messages to a former student. No other details have been released.

Emily Wendler / StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt signed a law Monday that reforms virtual charter school rules.

House Bill 2905, authored by Tulsa Republican Sheila Dills, will increase virtual charter school transparency and tweak policies lawmakers found problematic.

Virtual charters will be required to host orientations, increase required participation and limit the number of times students can transfer.

Because of a legislative session shortened by COVID-19, only a handful of education policy bills moved through the House and Senate to make it to the governor’s desk.

Time constraints meant only the bills most important to lawmakers could make it to Gov. Kevin Stitt.

So a hodgepodge of priority education legislation is currently being considered by the governor.

If signed by the governor, they would tweak virtual charter school rules, combat the teacher shortage and take other narrow measures.

Robby Korth / StateImpact Oklahoma

School is about to be out for summer.

Spring 2020 was a semester like no other after Oklahoma schools switched to a distance learning environment to combat the spread of COVID-19.

Pages