Oklahoma music

Lorrie Collins — one-half of the 1950s Oklahoma rockabilly duo The Collins Kids — was one of the earliest leading women of rock and roll music. Collins died on Saturday, as confirmed by her brother and bandmate Larry Collins. She was 76.

Lorrie and Larry were raised on a dairy farm in Pretty Water, near Sapulpa in northeastern Oklahoma in the 1940s.

Adam Kissick / NPR

Tuck and Patti need no more than each other and a guitar to make magic. Married and making music for nearly 40 years, Tuck Andress and Patti Cathcart perform as one with his masterful guitar playing and her fluid, free vocals.

Boz Scaggs is likely best known for his affiliation with the Steve Miller Band or 1976 songs like "Lido Shuffle" and "Lowdown." But through the years, he's also been crafting jazz and blues albums in homage to his earliest influences.

COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

Every month, NPR Music asks DJs from public radio stations across the country to name a new favorite song and, this month, KOSU featured Oklahoma City R&B and soul duo Adam & Kizzie.

Courtesy of the artist

Roger Miller wrote and performed some of country music's most enduring hits — most notably "Dang Me" and the eternal "King of the Road" — and dabbled in everything from Hollywood acting to writing a Tony-winning score. More than 25 years after his death, he remains a sizable influence on country's major stars, as a forthcoming tribute album makes clear.

Somewhere between dusk and nightfall, there's a point when the sky's deep reds and luminous notes of peach bleed into deep blues and silhouetted skylines. It's a somber, meditative medley of color, when the reflection of day turns dim; that's where the new record by Patrick McDermott, who records instrumental guitar music as North Americans, rests.

Christian Kelly Large

Oklahoma’s 2018 tornado season has been fairly quiet when compared to years past, especially in 2013, when multiple large twisters permanently altered lives and landscapes during the month of May in the central part of our state

One of those storms, the gigantic El Reno tornado on May 31, 2013, was the widest ever recorded—2.6 miles—and its unpredictability stunned even the experts, claiming the lives of four seasoned storm chasers, as well as 17 others.

Every month, NPR Music asks public radio personalities around this country to name a new favorite song and, this month, KOSU featured Oklahoma City musician Blaze McKenzie.

Note: NPR's First Listen audio comes down after the album is released. However, you can still listen with the Spotify or Apple Music playlist at the bottom of the page.

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