tribal gaming

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about Oklahoma's involvement in the upcoming Super Tuesday Presidential Primary, a call to the Attorney General on whether Governor Stitt can keep tribal gaming funds in an escrow without putting them in state coffers and Stitt signs his first bill of 2020 to increase transparency in private school money from public dollars.

 

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about a judges order to send the legal battle over tribal gaming compacts into mediation, Governor Stitt hiring a Washington, D.C. firm to re-imagine the structure of the state government and the battle of abortion bills at the state capitol between revoking the license of a doctor who performs abortion and an outright abolition of the practice.

Robby Korth / StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma tribes will pay the state an estimated $13 million dollars in Class III gaming money next Thursday. Since tribes believe the compacts auto-renewed at the start of the year – they are going to continue to remit their gaming funds like they have been for the past 15 years.

But the state isn’t going to put that money directly into education – the largest recipient of gaming money – even though it’s supposed to, under state law.

Robby Korth / StateImpact Oklahoma

Governor Kevin Stitt gave his second State of the State Address today before a joint session of the State House and Senate for the 58th Oklahoma Legislature.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the announcement from Mental Health and Substance Abuse Commissioner Terri White stepping down from her position and the House Speaker opposing Governor Stitt by saying the tribal gaming compacts automatically renewed for another 15 years on January 1st.

Photo Provided

Updated on January 17, 2020 at 3:13 p.m.

KOSU's Engagement Team has been reading and answering questions submitted to our recent survey on the tribal gaming compacts dispute. Below are answers to basic questions about tribal gaming compacts. This post will be updated as we get answers. 

Flickr / Michael Kappel

State and tribal leaders are at odds over the gaming compact and how much money in fees Oklahoma should receive from tribal-run casinos. 

Oklahoma Governor Kevin Stitt said the 15-year-old tribal compact ended on January 1, 2020. But, the Oklahoma Gaming Association and tribal leaders have said the language within the compact outlines an automatic renewal.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about a petition filed to allow voters to add recreational marijuana to the state constitution, the battle between Governor Stitt and tribal leaders over gaming compacts heats up as the end of the year gets closer and Oklahoma City Democratic Representative Shane Stone delays his resignation by one daym removing the need for a special election.

 

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and sitting in for Neva Hill is Oklahoma Council of Public Affairs Director of External Relations Dave Bond about renewal of calls to provide a Cost of Living Adjustment for state retirees, Governor Stitt goes before the U.S. Senate to support a federal proposal to stop states from using the Clean Water Act to block energy projects and time is running out in the stalemate between the governor and tribal leaders over gaming compacts.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about a push to change the way Oklahomans draw political districts by putting it in the hands of an independent committee rather than politicians, the Oklahoma County Sheriff plans to hand over control of the jail to a newly formed trust whether it's ready or not and the attorney general meets with tribal leaders to discuss gaming compacts.

Pages