Allison Herrera

Indigenous Affairs reporter

Allison Herrera joined the KOSU staff in April 2020. She is a radio and print journalist who has worked as a reporter for PRI's The World, as the climate and environment editor for Colorado Public Radio and as a freelance reporter for High Country News’ Indigenous Affairs desk.

While at The World, she covered gender and equity for a reporting project called Across Women’s Lives, which focused on women’s rights around the globe. This project took her to Ukraine, where Herrera showcased the country’s global surrogacy industry, and reported on families who were desperate to escape the ongoing civil war that they moved to abandoned towns near the Chernobyl nuclear disaster site. In 2019, she received a fellowship from the International Women in Media Fund to report on the issue of reproductive rights in Argentina, a country scarred by the effects of the Dirty War and a legacy of sexual and physical abuse directed towards women.

In 2015 and 2016, Herrera co-created and produced the Localore project Invisible Nations with KOSU. The project included video, radio and live events centered on telling better stories about Native American life in Oklahoma. Invisible Nations received several awards from the Associated Press and the Society of Professional Journalists.

In 2017, she and her colleague Ziva Branstetter received an Emmy award nomination for their Reveal story “Does the Time Fit the Crime?,” which centered on criminal justice in Oklahoma.

In 2019, Herrera’s story for High Country News and Center for Public Integrity titled "When Disaster Strikes, Indigenous Communities Receive Unequal Disaster Aid" received a Scripps Howard nomination for best environmental reporting along with the One Disaster Away series.

Herrera’s Native ties are from her Xolon Salinan tribal heritage; her family’s traditional village was in the Toro Creek area of the Central California coast.

Ways to Connect

Mairead Todd / KOSU

KOSU is covering the coronavirus in Oklahoma and how it's affecting our lives. Bookmark this page for the latest updates.

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Last Friday, Oklahoma Governor Kevin Stitt decided against appealing a U.S. District Court Judge's ruling that said compacts between the state and the tribes renewed on January 1st of this year.

"While I have chosen not to appeal this decision, I believe that the people of Oklahoma will demand a fair deal that benefits all 4 million Oklahomans," Stitt said in a statement.

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The Choctaw Nation is now powering some of its homes with solar energy.

governor.ok.gov

On Thursday, Oklahoma's Commission on Cooperative Sovereignty delivered their first report to Governor Kevin Stitt.

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On Wednesday, Oklahoma Attorney General Mike Hunter released a letter detailing a new plan he negotiated with leaders of some of the Five Tribes that would allow them and the state to compact over matters of criminal jurisdiction. The plan would require federal legislation.

facebook.com/citizenpotawatomination

The Citizen Potawatomi Nation will provide $40 million dollars in assistance to citizens who are financially struggling because of the pandemic.

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Oklahoma has one of the highest rates of domestic violence in the country -- more than 26,000 cases in 2019 alone according to the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation.

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Counting for the census ended last Thursday, but Tribes in Oklahoma and nationwide fear that the early end could lead to an undercounting of Native Americans.

Flickr / J. Stephen Conn

Two recent court decisions say the reservations of the Choctaw Nation and Chickasaw Nation were never disestablished.

Cherokee Nation

Oklahoma has had more than 102,000 cases of coronavirus and it's trying to keep pace with a record number of hospitalizations.

That's why Cherokee Nation Principal Chief Chuck Hoskin Jr. is pushing for a statewide mask mandate.

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