Stephanie Bice

Quinton Chandler / StateImpact Oklahoma

Updated 12:37 a.m.

A record number of Oklahomans voted this year. More than 1.5 million Oklahomans cast ballots during the 2020 general election, beating 2016's number of about 1.4 million. Oklahoma also saw about an 175% increase in mail and absentee voting compared to 2016.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and Civil Rights Attorney Ryan Kiesel about the upcoming General Election and races they are watching, the Oklahoma City Fraternal Order of Police endorses GOP State Senator Stephanie Bice for Congressional District Five and Democratic U.S. Senate candidate Abby Broyles outraises her opponent Incumbent Republican Jim Inhofe.

 

For this week’s Here & Now District Profile, we look at the race in Oklahoma’s 5th Congressional District, where Democratic incumbent Congresswoman Kendra Horn faces off against Republican State Sen. Stephanie Bice.

Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd speaks with Logan Layden, managing editor at State Impact Oklahoma and KGOU.

This article was originally published on WBUR.org.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about State Senator Stephanie Bice defeating Terry Neese in the Republican Primary Runoff for Congressional District moving to the General Election against incumbent Democrat Kendra Horn, while Horn is getting an endorsement from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce despite opposition from the State Chamber.

Mairead Todd / KOSU

State Senator Stephanie Bice advances to face Congresswoman Kendra Horn, Tulsa Mayor G.T. Bynum avoids predicted runoff, three incumbent state Senators lose and Oklahoma County will have its first Black sheriff.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about Oklahomans passing State Question 802 to expand Medicaid in the state, a runoff in the Republican primary between Stephanie Bice and Terry Neece to take on Congresswoman Kendra Horn and Abby Broyles wins the Democratic nomination to take on Senator Jim Inhofe.

A progressive shift underway in Colorado Democratic politics is spotlighted Tuesday in the primary for a U.S. Senate race that will likely help decide control of the chamber.

The contest between former Gov. John Hickenlooper and former state House Speaker Andrew Romanoff is the marquee race on Tuesday, but other themes are at play elsewhere, as voters also head to the polls in Utah and Oklahoma:

  • Former Gov. Jon Huntsman is looking to make a comeback in Utah.

Flickr / Marco Verch

A new law cracks down on giving antipsychotic drugs to patients in nursing homes in Oklahoma.

Senate Bill 142, signed by Governor Kevin Stitt last week, requires informed consent for nursing home patients and their families regarding the use of powerful antipsychotic drugs.

The bill’s author, Senator Stephanie Bice, says Oklahoma ranks as the worst state in the nation when it comes to the use of antipsychotics on nursing home patients with no psychiatric diagnosis.

Whitney Bryen / Oklahoma Watch

Tulsa liquor wholesaler Bryan Hendershot had a lot of money on the line when the Senate voted 34-11 to pass Senate Bill 608 on Monday.

The legislation, which passed the House earlier by a single vote, seeks to roll back a narrow part of 2016’s voter-approved alcohol-sales reforms by allowing top wine and spirit brands to be sold by all distributors in the state, instead of allowing manufacturers to decide who can sell their wine and spirits.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill about a ruling by the State Supreme Court saying the lawmakers can't put a $350M cap on pain and suffering, supporters of Medicaid expansion file an initiative petition to get it put on the ballot in 2020 and Governor Stitt recognizes his first 100 days in office.

 

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