liquor laws

JACOB MCCLELAND / OKLAHOMA PUBLIC MEDIA EXCHANGE

Oklahomans aged 21 years and older can now get beer, wine and spirits delivered to their front door, at least temporarily.

The Oklahoma ABLE Commission will allow delivery of alcoholic beverages until April 17th, following Governor Kevin Stitt’s newly amended executive orders to curb the spread of COVID-19.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the results of the Presidential Primary Super Tuesday vote in the Sooner State, seven counties pass new laws allowing liquor stores to stay open on Sundays & Oklahoma City voters say no to an 1/8 cent sales tax for municipal parks.

David Shankbone / Wikimedia Commons

You might notice something new when you walk into your local liquor store on Monday, October First.

The changes are coming after Oklahomans overwhelmingly supported State Question 792 back in November of 2016.

While liquor stores are getting extra options, big box stores like Wal-Mart are also getting to sell cold beer and wine which raises concens among most owners.

KOSU's Michael Cross got a chance to talk to Retail Liquor Association of Oklahoma President Bryan Kerr about what people should expect with the new law.

The sound of breaking glass reverberated through Utah on Saturday as the state's so-called Zion Curtain liquor law came crashing down.

H.B. 442, a sweeping piece of alcohol reform legislation the Utah State Legislature passed in March, means some restaurants can take down the partitions meant to block the view of alcoholic drinks being mixed and poured.

Purman Wilson Collection / Oklahoma Historical Society

Oklahomans are considering some of the biggest changes to the state’s liquor laws since the end of prohibition. If approved, State Question 792 would amend the state constitution and alter a system with roots planted during the days of Indian Territory.

An Oklahoma City bar has asked the state to clarify rules on infusing liquor with flavors such as bacon after one of its employees was arrested because of the bar's practices.

An attorney for The Pump Bar has been working with state Alcoholic Beverage Laws Enforcement Commission officials on language that would clarify that the infusion practice is subject to certain storage rules that comply with federal and state law, a commission spokesman said. The commission will consider adopting the language at its July 15 meeting.

Flickr / JasonParis

Oklahoma grocery store groups who are challenging a petition to overhaul the state's alcohol laws say the proposal would provide an unconstitutional advantage to liquor stores.

An Oklahoma Supreme Court referee on Tuesday heard arguments from the Oklahoma Grocers Association and the Retail Liquor Association of Oklahoma on a challenge to a proposed ballot measure that would amend the state constitution to allow grocery stores to sell strong beer and wine.

ThreeIfByBike / Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Oklahomans will have a chance to vote on expanding the state’s liquor laws this November.

State representatives approved Senate Joint Resolution 68 and its counterpart Senate Bill 383 on Thursday. The bill provides a new outline allowing full-strength, chilled beer to be sold in grocery and convenience stores and would require clerks who sell alcohol to be at least 18-years-old should voters approve a state question this fall.

State Representative Glen Mulready, R-Tulsa, said the legislation allows voters to be better informed ahead of the liquor law vote.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about mixed reaction in Oklahoma to the assumed nomination of Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump, with just three weeks left in the legislative session there's still no movement on the budget and the GOP in the House and Senate selects its leadership for 2017.

Tony Alter / Flickr

The Oklahoma Supreme Court has invalidated an initiative petition that calls for a statewide vote on whether to allow wine to be sold in grocery stores.

The Supreme Court handed down the ruling Tuesday and ordered the petition stricken from the November general election ballot.

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