Rachel Hubbard

Executive Director

Rachel Hubbard is a 20-year news veteran and serves as KOSU's executive director.

She began her radio career while still in high school, reading obituary and hospital reports as a part-time announcer and board operator at KTJS in Hobart, Oklahoma. Hubbard continued her radio career in 1999, joining KOSU as a student reporter. Following graduation from Oklahoma State University in 2003, Hubbard served as the station’s state capitol reporter and news director. She was promoted to associate director in 2007, managing the day to day programming and news operations of KOSU.

Hubbard spearheaded KOSU’s innovative collaboration with The Spy in 2012, giving a platform for local music and music otherwise not represented on the radio dial. She brought StoryCorps to Oklahoma City in 2018, allowing Oklahomans to share, record, and preserve their stories.

She serves on the board of directors for the Association of Independents in Radio (AIR) and mentors young journalists through NPR’s Next Generation Radio Project. Hubbard also currently serves as interim editor for StateImpact Oklahoma, a collaborative journalism project involving KOSU, KGOU, KWGS and KCCU. StateImpact reports on education, health, criminal justice, and how policy affects people.

During her tenure at KOSU, Hubbard has won national awards for her news coverage from the Public Media Journalists Association, the Scripps Howard Foundation and Society for Professional Journalists. She has also received numerous state and regional journalism awards and has been named to Oklahoma Gazette’s Forty Under 40 and Oklahoma Magazine’s 40 under 40.

Hubbard holds a Master’s of Entrepreneurship and a Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Communications from Oklahoma State University.

Ways to Connect

Rachel Hubbard

Same-sex couples across Oklahoma began to marry on Monday after the U.S. Supreme Court declined to take up appeals on several same-sex marriage rulings earlier in the day. That action caused the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals to lift a stay on their ruling against the ban on same-sex marriage in Oklahoma.

KOSU’s Ryan LaCroix reports on the couples that jumped at the chance to get married in Oklahoma County on Monday.

Roughly two dozen couples filtered into a crowded Oklahoma County Court Clerk’s office on Monday. Oklahoma County began issuing marriage licenses to same-sex couples early Monday afternoon.

Mary Pavliska and her partner Brandie Hobia have been together since 2011 and are adopting a child together. Mary says although the day has been confusing, she’s happy with the end result.

“I called you about 9 a.m. and said ‘Let’s go!’ Then, we had to wait. Then, we had to wait longer, then I said, ‘Now, we’re really going. Apparently, it’s official now, so we’re going.’ I came to work a Pavliska and I’m leaving a Hobia, so I can’t really complain.”

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Until recently, outside of education, no one really cared about education standards.  Few people outside of education really thought much about it before the Common Core controversy.  But where did these standards come from, and why do we have them?


Common Core, high stakes testing, A to F grading of schools, teacher shortages… it’s hard to sort out what is going on in Oklahoma schools, and we’re in the middle of an election that is likely to change the direction again.  Join us for On Tap, where we’ll discuss with teachers, administrators and the Oklahoma Department of Education what has happened and what we can expect in our kids’ classrooms next.

The event starts at 6 p.m., Wednesday, August 27 at Picasso Café located at 3009 Paseo Street, Oklahoma City, OK 73103.

After a devastating tornado rolled through Moore, Okla., last May, firefighters were scrambling to pull people out of storm shelters. Actually finding those shelters, though, was difficult. Landmarks had been swept away, and the town's emergency dispatcher was overwhelmed with calls.

"Yes, we're at 604 South Classen. There's people down," one caller said. "We're stuck under rubble. ... Please hurry."

Shonn Neidel was one of the firefighters rushing to rescue people that day, and he quickly saw a problem.

One year ago Tuesday, a violent tornado obliterated the city of Moore, Okla., killing 24 residents and leaving nearly 400 injured among the razed homes and businesses. It was the third violent tornado to strike the city in the past 15 years. But rather than move away, residents have stayed put in Moore — and more and more are actually moving here.

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