Kevin Stitt

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the announcement by Higher Education Chancellor Glen Johnson to retire from the position effective at the end of next year, AG Mike Hunter announces the state is hiring a Michigan law firm for $250,000 to deal with tribal gaming compacts and the Department of Corrections locks down state prisons after gang-related violence kills one inmate and injures dozens of others.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU' Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the decision by the Secretary of State's office to move forward with counting signatures on a petition to stop permitless carry, rather than waiting on a ruling from the State Supreme Court.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the ruling by a Cleveland County district judge awarding the state $572 million in its opioid lawsuit, supporters of a petition to stop permitless carry hope to gather enough signatures to get State Question 803 on the 2020 ballot and the Oklahoma City Council unanimously passes MAPS 4 and sends it to voters on December 10th.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and sitting in for Ryan Kiesel is ACLU Oklahoma Director of Policy and Advocacy Nicole McAfee. They discuss the call by Governor Stitt to remove Glen Johnson as Higher Education Chancellor, a claim by QuikTrip of an increase in property thefts since State Question 780 was passed by voters and the Cherokee Tribe pointing to a nearly 200 year old treaty in calling for representation in Congress.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about an attempt to stop a permitless carry law taking effect by November 1st, an alcohol distribution law getting ruled unconstitutional and Medicaid Expansion supporters working to gather nearly 178,000 signatures to get the proposition before voters in 2020.

Illustration by Dylan Goforth

Oklahoma state elected officials received nearly $2 million in campaign donations in the weeks leading up to, during and after this year’s legislative session, with two-thirds of those donations going to lawmakers, according to the most recent data from the Oklahoma Ethics Commission.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about a win for supporters of a ballot initiative petition on Medicaid Expansion when the state Supreme Court ruled it could move forward, the fate of $85M in an opioid settlement with Teva Pharmaceuticals awaits a judges ruling and Oklahoma City passes an ordinance allowing for an amnesty period for past due parking offenses and low level offenders.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks to Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about a challenge to a new alcohol law requiring the manufacturers of the top 25 brands to offer products to all distributors, recent flooding brings national attention in the form of visits from Vice President Mike Pence and Democratic Presidential candidate Beto O'Rourke and the Cherokee Nation elects Chuck Hoskin, Jr. to be its next Principal Chief.

Quinton Chandler / StateImpact Oklahoma

Multiple polls show the majority of Oklahoma voters support criminal justice reforms.

Survey data commissioned by Oklahoma Public Radio stations for the Oklahoma Engaged project also suggest a majority of voters believe the state’s sentencing laws need to be reworked.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill about the opioid trial starting in Norman which has grabbed national and international attention and state lawmakers end the 2019 legislative session a week earlier than required by the Constitution.

The trio also discusses some of the bills signed recently by Governor Stitt.

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