2020 legislative session

  This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the Oklahoma Supreme Court ordering the Secretary of State to start counting signatures on a ballot measure dealing with sentencing reform, lawmakers meeting to override gubernatorial vetoes while at the same time leaving some vetoes to stand.

 

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

Flickr / scubabrett22

Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt vetoed legislation late last week that would have allowed home delivery of medical marijuana.

Home delivery within a 10-mile radius was just a portion of House Bill 3228, which addressed several reforms in Oklahoma’s medical marijuana industry.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the decision by lawmakers to end the legislative session two weeks early, Governor Stitt vetoes a bill on rural broadband and lawmakers pass a bill giving a Cost of Living Adjustment for State Retirees.

The trio also discusses a constitutional challenge to the new law requiring notarization of absentee ballots and remembering Oklahoma City Republican Senator Brooks Douglass.

Johnny McClung / Unsplash

Oklahoma will now screen for dyslexia, the most common learning disability.

House Bill 2804 was signed by Governor Kevin Stitt on Tuesday. The measure will require dyslexia screening for students reading below grade level in kindergarten through third grade.

Kelly Sikkema / Unsplash

Updated May 20

Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt vetoed House Bill 4018 on Tuesday, writing that the Secretary of Digital Transformation David Ostrowe has already created a broadband task force and creating a Rural Broadband Expansion Council would be unneccesary and redundant.

Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt signed a law Monday that reforms virtual charter school rules.

House Bill 2905, authored by Tulsa Republican Sheila Dills, will increase virtual charter school transparency and tweak policies lawmakers found problematic.

Virtual charters will be required to host orientations, increase required participation and limit the number of times students can transfer.

The coronavirus took its toll on the 2020 legislative session.

Oklahoma lawmakers finished their work on Friday after meeting just 36 days since February 3, possibly the fewest in state history. Constitutionally, the legislature can still meet until the last Friday in May, but leaders say they will only call lawmakers back to override any vetoes from the governor.

Top gubernatorial issues left undone include criminal justice, medical billing and civil service reform, as well as agency consolidation and more public money for private schools.

Because of a legislative session shortened by COVID-19, only a handful of education policy bills moved through the House and Senate to make it to the governor’s desk.

Time constraints meant only the bills most important to lawmakers could make it to Gov. Kevin Stitt.

So a hodgepodge of priority education legislation is currently being considered by the governor.

If signed by the governor, they would tweak virtual charter school rules, combat the teacher shortage and take other narrow measures.

Oklahoma Governor Kevin Stitt is considering legislation to give raises to state retirees for the first time in 12 years.

The measure to give Cost of Living Adjustments to firefighters, law enforcement and teachers passed the Senate as one of the last bills before the legislative session ended on Friday.

The bill’s author, Senator Roger Thompson, says the retiree systems are well-funded even though the hit to the programs will be a 1.5 to 1.8 percent increase.

Pages