parole

Wesley Fryer / Flickr

As the state Pardon and Parole Board prepares to consider 14 releases on Wednesday, reform advocates are petitioning the state of Oklahoma to reduce the prison population and release prisoners who are at higher risk of dying from COVID-19.

Oklahoma could release up to 14 prisoners at high risk for COVID-19.

126 individuals were classified as having severe medical needs, but only 14 met the eligibility requirements for medical parole.

Corrections officials say the inmates couldn’t be serving time for a violent crime, have a history of domestic violence or have to register as a sex offender upon release.

The state’s Pardon and Parole Board will hear an emergency medical parole docket on May 13.

---

Quinton Chandler / StateImpact Oklahoma

A popular desire for reform led lawmakers to push the release of hundreds of people from Oklahoma prisons in a record commutation last year. The climactic event was born from a series of reforms that have moved Oklahoma away from the number one spot for incarceration. But, that progress might be temporary.

Nearly half the people admitted to state prisons in the U.S. are there because of violations of probation or parole, according to a new nationwide study that highlights the personal and economic costs of the practice.

The Council of State Governments Justice Center said the majority of these violations are for "minor infractions," such as failing a drug test or missing a curfew. Those so-called technical violations cost states $2.8 billion every year, the report says.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Poltical Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about a grand jury investigation into the State Health Department finds reprehensible and inept practices leading officials to believe the agaency was insolvent and the subsequent layoff of nearly 200 people, boycotts and challenges are growing against a referendum petition to remove tax increases to pay for raises to teachers, school support staff and state workers as are questions of the validity of the petitions themselves and Tulsa Pub

Quinton Chandler / StateImpact Oklahoma

Baby Roman is just waking up from his afternoon nap and now he’s looking for a toy. His grandfather, Frank McCarrell, is trying to distract him from the house’s décor with a bottle of milk.

“He don’t usually be asleep this time,” said McCarrell, who just finished his workday to babysit for his daughter. “When I come home … usually he’s up and raring to go. Huh? You be running Papa around?

Quinton Chandler / StateImpact Oklahoma

State Senators sent Gov. Mary Fallin new standards for sentencing teens to life without parole Wednesday.

The standards were requested by state district attorneys and are a response to a U.S. Supreme Court ban on mandatory life without parole sentences for teens.

Quinton Chandler / StateImpact Oklahoma

Tucker McGee is in prison for murdering teenager JaRay Wilson. McGee was days away from turning 18. Now, more than five years after the murder, Legislators and district attorneys fear his sentence of life in prison without parole is on the verge of being reduced.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about a budget deal at the State Capitol could lead to an early end to the 2018 legislative session, the state House passes an amended criminal justice reform bill which makes it easier for juveniles to get life without parole and Governor Fallin vetoes a measure which would have allowed people to take selfies with their ballots.

QUINTON CHANDLER/STATEIMPACT OKLAHOMA

Gov. Mary Fallin signed seven criminal justice reform bills this week ending a bumpy ride for legislation designed to curb prison population growth in Oklahoma.

Fallin says the measures represent smart ways to protect public safety, keep families together — and save taxpayer money.

Most of the legislation was introduced in 2017 but stalled in committee. This year, the bills were reconsidered after compromises between legislators, district attorneys and other government agencies.

Pages