Quinton Chandler

StateImpact Oklahoma - Criminal Justice Reporter

Quinton Chandler joined StateImpact Oklahoma in January 2018, focusing on criminal justice reporting.

He is a graduate of Oklahoma State University with degrees in Economics and Marketing. Chandler was a student reporter at KOSU, and later a host and reporter at KBBI Radio in Homer, Alaska and education reporter at KTOO Public Media in Juneau, Alaska.

Quinton loves writing, reading and has an intense relationship with his Netflix account.

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Quinton Chandler / StateImpact Oklahoma

Prison is not fun anymore for Warren Rawls. The 36-year-old has been in and out of prison six times, and he has decided he’s not going back. He says during a recent statewide prison lockdown he was handcuffed everywhere he went – even the shower.

Rawls is one of more than 450 Oklahomans set free in the nation’s largest single-day commutation on record.

twitter.com/OklaDOC

The state of Oklahoma plans to release hundreds of prisoners Monday after their sentences were reduced by the state's Pardon and Parole Board. 462 state prisoners could be sent home, which would represent the nation's largest single day commutation.

Quinton Chandler / StateImpact Oklahoma

Some Oklahomans are dreadfully counting the days until Oklahoma’s new law that will allow most people to carry a gun without a state permit takes effect.

With rallies, lawsuits and a failed attempt to get the issue before voters, the permitless carry law has spawned a lot of fear.

facebook.com/rogerscountysheriffsoffice

Some parts of criminal justice reform can feel risky. If you propose letting someone out of jail who has committed a crime, you reduce jail overcrowding, but does it put the community at risk? That’s a question Rogers County in northeastern Oklahoma has been trying to answer.

Quinton Chandler / StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma County’s jail is run by the local sheriff, just like most counties in the state.

As news headlines about overcrowding, inmate deaths, lawsuits and maintenance issues became increasingly common, county officials and civic leaders called for a change in jail leadership.

Quinton Chandler / StateImpact Oklahoma

At eight-years-old David Hall was taken from his mother’s house in Canadian County and placed into foster care. He had been abused most of his life and was struggling with PTSD.

Hall says he didn’t talk about being abused, he assumed it was normal.

“That’s not really something you talk about at school. When I was a kid, I talked about Scooby-Doo and things like that,” Hall said.

Quinton Chandler / StateImpact Oklahoma

In 2016, Oklahoma voters passed two state questions intended to reduce the state’s prison population. Every year since, lawmakers have introduced bills designed to help decrease the number of people serving time.

Courtesy: Spencer Bryan / Bryan & Terrill Law

When a private citizen’s civil rights are violated by the government, typically, they have the opportunity to sue, but under a recent Oklahoma Supreme Court decision, that might not be the case for inmates in Oklahoma jails and detention centers.

Quinton Chandler / StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma Department of Corrections Director Joe Allbaugh abruptly resigned on Wednesday, during a Board of Corrections meeting. Allbaugh said he is leaving the agency immediately and will officially retire on July 1.

Quinton Chandler / StateImpact Oklahoma

Multiple polls show the majority of Oklahoma voters support criminal justice reforms.

Survey data commissioned by Oklahoma Public Radio stations for the Oklahoma Engaged project also suggest a majority of voters believe the state’s sentencing laws need to be reworked.

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