Comanche Nation

The two winter storms and the plunging temperatures have put a strain on Oklahoma's power grid and natural gas supply. Tribal Nations across the state are responding by closing businesses, rescheduling vaccine appointments and delivering firewood to residents for fuel. 

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about a criminal justice reform group calling on Governor Kevin Stitt and the Department of Corrections to take steps to stem the spread of COVID-19, Tulsa City Council unanimously approved a new Hate Crimes ordinance to include sexual orientation and gender identity and the state Supreme Court denies Stitt's request for a rehearing on its decision over tribal gaming compacts.

 

Provided

The Oklahoma Supreme Court ruled in July the gaming compacts Oklahoma Governor Kevin Stitt entered into with the Otoe-Missouria Tribe and Comanche Nation were invalid.

Stitt requested a rehearing of that petition but in a 5-1 ruling on Monday, members of the Oklahoma Supreme Court denied that request.

twitter.com/GovStitt

Four tribes filed a federal lawsuit over the approval of two new gaming compacts signed in April.

The Cherokee Nation, Chickasaw Nation, Choctaw Nation and Citizen Potawatomi Nation filed a federal lawsuit against the Department of the Interior, Oklahoma Governor Kevin Stitt, Comanche Nation Chairman William Nelson and Otoe-Missouria Tribal Chairman John Shotton.

Provided

The Oklahoma Supreme Court ruled on Tuesday that Governor Kevin Stitt did not have the authority to enter into gaming compact agreements with the Otoe-Missouria Tribe and the Comanche Nation. The compacts have been ruled invalid.

twitter.com/GovStitt

Despite pending lawsuits in both state and federal court, two new gaming compacts will go into effect.

On Monday, the Department of Interior published the agreements in the Federal Register for compacts signed at the end of April between the state of Oklahoma and the Comanche Nation, and the Otoe-Missouria Tribe.

twitter.com/GovStitt

By default, the U.S. Department of the Interior, the federal agency that governs agreements between states and tribes, has approved the gaming compacts Oklahoma Governor Kevin Stitt entered into in April with the Comanche Nation and the Otoe-Missouria Tribe.

twitter.com/GovStitt

The U.S. Department of the Interior has approved gaming compacts Oklahoma Governor Kevin Stitt entered into with two tribes in April.

The 45-day deadline for the Department of the Interior to approve the gaming compacts between Stitt and the Comanche Nation and the Otoe-Missouria Tribe ended on June 7. The department took no action, which means the agreements can take effect once they're published in the Federal Register.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about an override of the governor's veto of the state budget, Governor Stitt forms a bipartisan committee to deal with the federal funds to deal with the COVID-19 pandemic and the Senate says sit won't confirm Interim Health Commissioner Gary Cox to the job leading the agency.

The Oklahoma Indian Gaming Association announced Thursday that they are suspending the membership of the Otoe Missouria Tribe and the Comanche Nation.

Pages