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Here's who will help Biden's Supreme Court pick navigate Senate hearings

Former Sen. Doug Jones of Alabama, seen here in a 2018 file photo, has been tapped to help President Biden's to-be-named Supreme Court nominee through the Senate confirmation process.
J. Scott Applewhite
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AP
Former Sen. Doug Jones of Alabama, seen here in a 2018 file photo, has been tapped to help President Biden's to-be-named Supreme Court nominee through the Senate confirmation process.

Updated February 2, 2022 at 5:52 PM ET

When President Biden names his nominee to fill a vacancy on the Supreme Court, he will lean on former Sen. Doug Jones of Alabama to help guide her through the Senate confirmation process, the White House said.

White House press secretary Jen Psaki has said that Biden plans to have a team of people shepherding his nominee through the process, including senior White House officials and counsel, as well as expertise from outside the building. Jones will be part of that team.

Jones is best known for prosecuting the perpetrators of the Birmingham church bombing almost 40 years after four young girls were killed in the civil rights era crime. He won a special election in 2017 to fill the seat left by Jeff Sessions when he became attorney general, and was known as a moderate Democrat, working across the aisle with Republicans. Jones worked on the Senate Judiciary Committee as a staff counsel after he graduated from law school.

President Biden and Vice President Harris met with Sen. Dick Durbin, right, chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, and Sen. Chuck Grassley, left, the ranking Republican, on Tuesday.
Patrick Semansky / AP
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AP
President Biden and Vice President Harris met with Sen. Dick Durbin, right, chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, and Sen. Chuck Grassley, left, the ranking Republican, on Tuesday.

Biden has said he plans to name his nominee by the end of the month, and has pledged to choose a Black woman for the job. The White House has said there is a broad field of potential candidates, with several early frontrunners.

Biden is also bringing in strategist Minyon Moore to "mobilize a nationwide engagement effort" around his pick, the White House said in a statement. Moore was a top political aide to former President Bill Clinton and a former chief operating officer at the Democratic National Committee. Also working on messaging: Ben LaBolt, a spokesman for former President Barack Obama during the confirmation process for justices Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan.

White House counsel Dana Remus is leading the process. Biden is also being advised by Vice President Harris and her counsel, Josh Hsu; his chief of staff Ron Klain; senior adviser Cedric Richmond; legislative affairs advisers Louisa Terrell and Reema Dodin; and senior counsel Paige Herwig.

Biden met at the White House on Tuesday with Sen. Dick Durbin, chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, and Sen. Chuck Grassley, the top Republican. GOP Senate leader Mitch McConnell said in a statement that he had also spoken with Biden on Tuesday by phone about his upcoming pick. Biden has said he is seeking advice from senators and outside experts during the process.

Copyright 2022 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Biden campaigned for Jones during his 2017 special election race for an Alabama Senate seat.
Brynn Anderson / AP
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AP
Biden campaigned for Jones during his 2017 special election race for an Alabama Senate seat.

Scott Detrow is a White House correspondent for NPR and co-hosts the NPR Politics Podcast.
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