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Motel near Oklahoma City's Bricktown to be converted into affordable housing

The Motel 6 at 1800 E Reno Ave will be converted into affordable housing for those experiencing homelessness.
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The Motel 6 at 1800 E Reno Ave will be converted into affordable housing for those experiencing homelessness.

The Oklahoma City Housing Authority is set to purchase an old Motel 6 to convert into affordable housing.

The first of the Oklahoma City Housing Authority’s MAPS4-funded homelessness reduction projects will include 75 motel rooms converted into studio apartments for low-income residents.

The units will be leased using a combination of project-based vouchers and Section 8 housing vouchers.

The old Motel 6 near Bricktown is being purchased for $3.75 million. An additional $2 million will be spent on renovations, which are estimated to take between nine and 12 months.

“It’s the intent to serve individuals experiencing chronic homelessness who might not be approved for subsidized housing,” Kassy Malone, the OHCA's director of real estate told The Oklahoman. “This gives us some wiggle room."

Oklahoma City's most recent point-in-time count showed more than 1,400 people were experiencing homelessness in the city.

According to the report, Oklahoma County lacks over 4,500 affordable housing units. More no-barrier or low-barrier housing would help Oklahoma City reduce the rate of people experiencing homelessness.

The MAPS4 homelessness reduction project has a total budget of more than $55 million to be spent on expanding affordable housing over the next several years.

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Hannah France is a reporter and producer for KGOU.
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