Thanksgiving

Despite the repeated warnings of public health experts and officials, millions of people traveled for Thanksgiving.

Perhaps you're one of them.

How To Maximize Your Thanksgiving Leftovers

Nov 27, 2020

Our refrigerators will probably look a bit different the day after Thanksgiving this year. With so many staying home and having smaller celebrations, the amount and variety of leftovers will be limited. But there are still dozens of interesting ways to use leftovers to create great meals for days to come.

There's soup to make, and sandwiches to build. The classic midnight sandwich: turkey, cranberry sauce, mashed potatoes and/or stuffing, and hot gravy piled onto any type of sandwich bread.

Before the pandemic trapped Stacey Mei Yan Fong in her Brooklyn kitchen, the 32-year-old handbag designer was baking her way across America, one pie at a time.

Confirmed cases of the coronavirus are surging. In the last week, more than 1 million people in the U.S. have tested positive. Hospitals around the country are filling up and sounding the alarm that they are short of staff and personal protective equipment.

For Walter Fleming, an enrolled member of the Kickapoo tribe in Kansas, Thanksgiving will be difficult this year because so many Native Americans have died from COVID-19.

"Particularly because it's been among our elders, the grieving is gonna be that much more," Fleming said. "These are the cultural guardians."

Fleming is a professor of Native American studies at Montana State University, who observes the holiday. He says it's a chance for people to come together, feast and celebrate.

A lot will be missing about Thanksgiving this year. It's a holiday that's celebrated on a bedrock of bringing family and friends, near and far, together for a big meal and lots of catching up, but the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention urges: "As cases continue to increase rapidly across the United States, the safest way to celebrate Thanksgiving is to celebrate at home with people you live with."

Updated at 2:40 p.m. ET

A U.S. president again took part in the very strange and myth-filled tradition of pardoning a turkey at the White House on Tuesday.

Millions of Americans are ignoring the advice of public health experts and traveling for the Thanksgiving holiday.

The Transportation Security Administration reported that more than 1.04 million people went through airport security checkpoints Sunday, the most since mid-March, and about 1 million more went through TSA checkpoints each day on Friday and Saturday.

Across the country, public officials are urging people to stay home and stay safe during the upcoming Thanksgiving holiday amid a dramatic rise in new cases of COVID-19 in nearly every state.

You should be counting your Thanksgiving blessings if you have someone like Jasmine Surti in your immediate family or circle. She's a mother, a daughter, a friend to many in Lawrenceville, N.J. And she's the sort of super-planner who joyfully takes on the daunting task of organizing a pandemic Thanksgiving.

"Well, I guess I like to make spreadsheets and surveys and things," Surti acknowledges with sheepish pride. "Basically, problem solving, you could say."

Pages