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The Daily
Weekdays from 6:30-7 p.m.

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. It's half an hour of context and humanity every evening.

The Daily is a five-day-a-week audio show from The New York Times. In just one year, the show has built an audience of over one million listeners a day; become the most-downloaded new show in 2017 on Apple Podcasts; won a DuPont-Columbia University Award for audio excellence; and been named a top podcast of the year by several media outlets.

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  • The Environmental Protection Agency has begun for the first time to regulate a class of synthetic chemicals known as “forever chemicals” in America’s drinking water.Kim Tingley, a contributing writer for The New York Times Magazine, explains how these chemicals, which have been linked to liver disease and other serious health problems, came to be in the water supply — and in many more places.Guest: Kim Tingley, a contributing writer for The New York Times Magazine.Background reading: “Forever chemicals” are everywhere. What are they doing to us?The E.P.A. issued its rule about “forever chemicals” last week.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.
  • A Times investigation shows how the country’s biggest technology companies, as they raced to build powerful new artificial intelligence systems, bent and broke the rules from the start.Cade Metz, a technology reporter for The Times, explains what he uncovered.Guest: Cade Metz, a technology reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: How tech giants cut corners to harvest data for A.I.What to know about tech companies using A.I. to teach their own A.I.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.
  • Overnight on Saturday, Iran launched its first direct attack on Israeli soil, shooting hundreds of missiles and drones at multiple targets.Eric Schmitt, a national security correspondent for The Times, explains what happened and considers whether a broader war is brewing in the Middle East.Guest: Eric Schmitt, a national security correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Here is what we know about Iran’s attack on Israel.The barrage made the Middle East’s new reality undeniable: Clashes are becoming harder and harder to contain.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.
  • At the center of the criminal case against former President Donald Trump in Manhattan is the accusation that Trump took part in a scheme to turn The National Enquirer and its sister publications into an arm of his 2016 presidential campaign. The documents detailed three “hush money” payments made to a series of individuals to guarantee their silence about potentially damaging stories in the months before the election. Because this was done with the goal of helping his election chances, the case implied, these payments amounted to a form of illegal, undisclosed campaign spending. And because Trump created paperwork to make the payments seem like regular legal expenses, that amounted to a criminal effort at a coverup, argued Alvin Bragg, the district attorney of Manhattan. Trump has denied the charges against him.For Lachlan Cartwright, reading the indictment was like stepping through the looking glass, because it described a three-year period in his own professional life, one that he has come to deeply regret. Now, as a former president faces a criminal trial for the first time in American history, Cartwright is forced to grapple with what really happened at The Enquirer in those years — and whether and how he can ever set things right.
  • Warning: this episode contains descriptions of violence.A massive scam targeting older Americans who own timeshare properties has resulted in hundreds of millions of dollars sent to Mexico.Maria Abi-Habib, an investigative correspondent for The Times, tells the story of a victim who lost everything, and of the criminal group making the scam calls — Jalisco New Generation, one of Mexico’s most violent cartels.Guest: Maria Abi-Habib, an investigative correspondent for The New York Times based in Mexico City.Background reading: How a brutal Mexican drug cartel came to target seniors and their timeshares.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.
  • For former President Donald J. Trump, 2024 was supposed to be dominated by criminal trials. Instead, he’s found ways to delay almost all of them.Alan Feuer, who covers the criminal cases against Mr. Trump for The Times, explains how he did it.Guest: Alan Feuer, who covers extremism and political violence for The New York Times.Background reading: On Wednesday, Donald J. Trump lost his third try in a week to delay his upcoming Manhattan trial.But stalling has worked for Mr. Trump in the past.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.
  • By the time his first term was over, Donald J. Trump had cemented his place as the most anti-abortion president in U.S. history. Now, facing political blowback, he’s trying to change that reputation.Lisa Lerer, a national political correspondent for The Times, discusses whether Mr. Trump’s election-year pivot can work.Guest: Lisa Lerer, a national political correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: After months of mixed signals, former President Donald J. Trump said abortion restrictions should be left to the states.On abortion, Mr. Trump chose politics over principles. Will it matter?For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.
  • When Elon Musk set up Tesla’s factory in China, he made a bet that brought him cheap parts and capable workers — a bet that made him ultrarich and saved his company.Mara Hvistendahl, an investigative reporter for The Times, explains why, now, that lifeline may have given China the tools to beat Tesla at its own game. Guest: Mara Hvistendahl, an investigative reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: A pivot to China saved Elon Musk. It also bound him to Beijing.Mr. Musk helped create the Chinese electric vehicle industry. But he is now facing challenges there as well as scrutiny in the West over his reliance on China.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.
  • Today, millions of Americans will have the opportunity to see a rare total solar eclipse.Fred Espenak, a retired astrophysicist known as Mr. Eclipse, was so blown away by an eclipse he saw as a teenager that he dedicated his life to traveling the world and seeing as many as he could.Mr. Espenak discusses the eclipses that have punctuated and defined the most important moments in his life, and explains why these celestial phenomena are such a wonder to experience.Guest: Fred Espenak, a.k.a. “Mr. Eclipse,” a former NASA astrophysicist and lifelong eclipse chaser.Background reading: A total solar eclipse is coming. Here’s what you need to know.Millions of people making plans to be in the path of the solar eclipse on Monday know it will be awe-inspiring. What is that feeling?The eclipse that ended a war and shook the gods forever.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.
  • Chris Kerr was 12 when he first observed a deathbed vision. His memory of that summer in 1974 is blurred, but not the sense of mystery he felt at the bedside of his dying father. Throughout Kerr’s childhood in Toronto, his father, a surgeon, was too busy to spend much time with his son, except for an annual fishing trip they took, just the two of them, to the Canadian wilderness. Gaunt and weakened by cancer at 42, his father reached for the buttons on Kerr’s shirt, fiddled with them and said something about getting ready to catch the plane to their cabin in the woods. “I knew intuitively, I knew wherever he was, must be a good place because we were going fishing,” Kerr told me.Kerr now calls what he witnessed an end-of-life vision. His father wasn’t delusional, he believes. His mind was taking him to a time and place where he and his son could be together, in the wilds of northern Canada.Kerr followed his father into medicine, and in the last 10 years he has hired a permanent research team that expanded studies on deathbed visions to include interviews with patients receiving hospice care at home and with their families, deepening researchers’ understanding of the variety and profundity of these visions.