military

The Department of Justice asked the Supreme Court on Friday to bypass lower courts and rule quickly on its ban of most transgender military members.

Two new reports on the U.S. military were released Wednesday, and they offered contradictory messages.

Now that the Democrats have won control of the House of Representatives, the question is this: Will there be more oversight of U.S. military operations?

One Capitol Hill aide told NPR that there likely will be greater focus by Democrats on the way ahead in Afghanistan, Iraq and Syria, where U.S. troops are on the ground, training local forces and going after terrorist enclaves.

President Trump said Wednesday he could send up to 15,000 troops to the U.S.-Mexico border, which would surpass the number of soldiers currently stationed in Afghanistan.

Speaking to reporters as he left the White House for a campaign rally Wednesday night in Florida, Trump said the number of military personnel on the border "will go up to anywhere between 10,000 and 15,000 military personnel on top of the Border Patrol, ICE, and everybody else at the border."

Updated Aug. 17 at 3 p.m. ET

The parade of U.S. military forces through the streets of Washington, D.C., that was ordered up by President Trump will be delayed, according to the Department of Defense.

The parade had been planned for the day before Veterans Day but Col. Rob Manning, a Pentagon spokesman, said Thursday without explanation that organizers would "explore opportunities in 2019."

The Pentagon says it’s working to complete background checks for noncitizens who want to join the U.S. armed forces. It’s part of a controversial program that tried to recruit certain medical or language skills into the ranks.

The StoryCorps mobile booth was in Oklahoma City in early 2018, and we're bringing you some of the stories that were recorded here. Locally recorded stories will air Wednesdays during Morning Edition and All Things Considered on KOSU.

Technological enhancements have made it easier for soldiers at war to communicate with loved ones back home, but it wasn't always easy. Bob Ford and Gean Atkinson came to the StoryCorps mobile booth in Oklahoma City and reflected on efforts to stay in contact with their families while serving in the Vietnam War.

It may seem counter-intuitive and head-scratchingly odd, but Congress nearly always approves defense spending bills before the armed services committees — which actually oversee the Pentagon — vote on how the money will be spent.

Not this year.

Updated at 3 a.m. ET on Thursday

The purported remains of Americans who died in the Korean War arrived in Hawaii on Wednesday, escorted in a solemn ceremony onto U.S. soil 65 years after the conflict ended.

They'll be analyzed in hopes of providing a new sense of closure for families who lost loved ones in the war that ended with a cease-fire in 1953. But it could be weeks or years before the identities of any Americans are confirmed.

Chris Ferrari was just 18 the first time he balanced a rocket launcher on his right shoulder and aimed it at a practice target.

"Your adrenaline's going and you're trying to focus on getting that round to hit, and then you go to squeeze that trigger and, you know."

Boom!

The report is loud enough to burst the eardrums of anyone not wearing military-grade hearing protection. And the blast wave from the weapon is so powerful it feels like a whole-body punch.

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