Huo Jingnan

Huo Jingnan (she/her) is an assistant producer on NPR's investigations team. She helps with reporting, research, and production both on the team and in the network. She was the primary data reporter on Coal's Deadly Dust, a project investigating black lung disease's resurgence. The project won an Edward Murrow Award and NASEM Communications award, and was nominated for a George Foster Peabody award.

She has also analyzed air monitoring data to see if lockdowns under the coronavirus pandemic made the air cleaner, and investigated why face mask guidelines differ between countries.

Huo has a master's degree from Northwestern University's Medill School of Journalism.

With jittery shoppers flocking to supermarkets to stock up on supplies for the coronavirus outbreak, some of the country's largest grocery chains are announcing measures to enhance sanitation and maintain supplies.

Across the U.S., hand sanitizer, toilet paper, sanitation wipes and canned goods have been flying off shelves as the number of confirmed coronavirus cases continues to climb.

Updated at 4:42 p.m. ET

More than two dozen rockets were fired at a military base north of Baghdad hosting American forces Saturday morning, wounding three members of the U.S.-led coalition and two Iraqi soldiers, the coalition's spokesperson announced in a tweet.

More than 10,000 civilians were killed or injured in armed conflict in Afghanistan in 2019, continuing a six-year streak and putting total casualties in the past decade over 100,000, a United Nations report said Saturday.

Updated at 10:46 p.m. ET

A gunman armed with an assault rifle killed at least 27 people and wounded more than 52 in a Thai city while livestreaming himself on social media Saturday, officials say.

The suspect has been identified as a junior soldier at a base near the city of Nakhon Ratchasima, which is also known as Korat and is about a 180-mile drive northeast of Bangkok.

China says it has launched an investigation into "issues" related to the death on Friday of a doctor whose early efforts to alert his colleagues to the dangers of a new coronavirus were quashed by authorities.

Meanwhile, President Trump spoke with China's leader Xi Jinping to discuss the coronavirus epidemic, which has rapidly gone global since it began in China in December.

Dr. Li Wenliang, an ophthalmologist working in Wuhan, the Chinese city where the epidemic originated, died on Friday local time, weeks after he was hospitalized and treated for a coronavirus infection.

Fiat Chrysler Automobiles reached a tentative labor agreement with the United Auto Workers on Saturday, becoming the last of the big three Detroit automakers to arrive at a deal with the labor union this year.

The four-year agreement, which covers hourly workers at the company, would secure a total of $9 billion worth of investments involving 7,900 jobs, according a statement from the UAW. The agreement must still be approved by the union's national council, and then pass a ratification vote by the company's 47,000 union-represented workers.

A small relic of wood believed to be a fragment of the manger where Jesus was laid after his birth arrived in Bethlehem on Saturday, a gift from Pope Francis to help mark the start of the Christmas season.

Dozens of coal miners are expected on Capitol Hill on Tuesday, where they'll press federal regulators and members of Congress to address the epidemic of deadly progressive massive fibrosis, the advanced stage of black lung disease.

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