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Lelia Foley-Davis speaks to a rotunda full of people at the Oklahoma Capitol’s inaugural Black History Day. Foley-Davis was the first Black woman mayor in the U.S. She served in the all-Black town of Taft in the 70s and again in the 2000s.
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Black History Day at the Oklahoma State Capitol

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Lelia Foley-Davis speaks to a rotunda full of people at the Oklahoma Capitol’s inaugural Black History Day. Foley-Davis was the first Black woman mayor in the U.S. She served in the all-Black town of Taft in the 70s and again in the 2000s. (Beth Wallis / StateImpact Oklahoma)
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Cheerleaders from Star Spencer High School perform at Black History Day in February, 2023. The students wore sweatshirts honoring Dunjee High School, an all-Black school built in 1934 in Spencer, Oklahoma, and named after Oklahoma City civil rights leader Roscoe Dunjee. The school closed in 1972 during desegregation.  (Beth Wallis / StateImpact Oklahoma)
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“We will struggle together to ensure a better world.” Oklahoma City rapper Jabee delivers an address on overcoming oppression at the first Black History Day at the Oklahoma State Capitol.  (Beth Wallis / StateImpact Oklahoma)
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A sousaphone player solos during a performance of the Millwood Marching Band. The band performed at the Oklahoma State Capitol for Black History Day.  (Beth Wallis / StateImpact Oklahoma)
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College students from the Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity perform a stomp dance for Black History Day at the Oklahoma State Capitol. Alpha Phi Alpha is the largest predominantly Black fraternity in the nation and was home to civil rights leaders W.E.B. DuBois and Martin Luther King, Jr.  (Beth Wallis / StateImpact Oklahoma)
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A student from the Star Spencer Marching Band plays a snare drum during the first Black History Day at the Capitol in February, 2023.  (Beth Wallis / StateImpact Oklahoma)
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Marilyn Luper Hildreth, daughter of civil rights icon Clara Luper, charges Black young people to, “Go home… and tell the story of our people, tell them about the kings and queens we represent.”  (Beth Wallis / StateImpact Oklahoma)
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