U.S. Capitol Insurrection

When former President Donald Trump's impeachment trial begins in the Senate today, two of the people at the center of the action will have a common connection: Montgomery County, Pa.

Impeachment manager Madeleine Dean, a congressional Democrat, will try to make the case that Trump directly incited violence at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. Trump attorney Bruce Castor Jr., the Republican former county district attorney and commissioner, will argue that Trump can't be convicted because he has already left office.

A constitutional law professor whose work is cited extensively by former President Donald Trump's lawyers in their impeachment defense brief says his work has been seriously misrepresented.

The Senate trial of former President Donald Trump for one article of impeachment — incitement of the insurrection at the Capitol on Jan. 6 — starts Tuesday with a debate over whether the Constitution allows for prosecution of a president once he leaves office. The debate comes about a year after the Senate acquitted then-President Trump on two counts of abuse of power and obstruction.

Editor's note: This story was first published on Feb. 9, 2021. It is regularly updated, and includes explicit language.

Nearly every day since insurrectionists stormed the U.S. Capitol, the list of those charged in the attack has grown longer. The government has now identified more than 250 suspects in the Jan. 6 rioting, which ended with five people dead, including a U.S. Capitol Police officer.

Ethan Nordean, a self-described "Sergeant of Arms" in the extremist group the Proud Boys, will remain in custody for his alleged role in the U.S. Capitol riot until his trial hearing later this month.

A Seattle magistrate judge on Monday ruled that Nordean, who also goes by Rufio Panman, would be released on bond but then halted the decision, giving the Department of Justice time to appeal. Hours later, U.S. District Judge Beryl Howell in Washington, D.C., ordered Nordean's return to the capital pending the appeal.

Updated on Friday at 2 p.m. ET

Former President Donald Trump made history when he became the first president to be impeached twice by the House of Representatives. Roughly a year ago, the Senate acquitted Trump on two articles — abuse of power and obstruction.

Former President Donald Trump's lawyers dismiss the impeachment case against him as "political theater," rejecting the premise that he incited the insurrection at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6.

Kelly Sikkema / Unsplash

Living through major historical events — like the worst pandemic in a century and the insurrection at the U.S. Capitol — has been trying for adults. It can be tough on kids too, but there are steps that can be taken to make it a little easier.

Updated at 1 p.m. ET

Lawyers for Donald Trump are rejecting the House managers' case for convicting the former president, calling it unconstitutional "political theater" and urging the Senate to dismiss the case.

Updated at 1:50 p.m. ET Sunday

The Wyoming Republican Party voted Saturday to censure Rep. Liz Cheney and also asked her to resign for her vote last month to impeach then-President Donald Trump after the insurrection at the Capitol on Jan. 6.

On Sunday, Cheney defended her decision.

Pages