Tulsa

Angel Portillo doesn't think about climate change much. It's not that he doesn't care. He just has other things to worry about. Climate change seems so far away, so big.

Lately though, Portillo says he has been thinking about it more often.

Standing on the banks of a swollen and surging Arkansas River, just upriver from a cluster of flooded businesses and homes, it's easy to see why.

"Stuff like this," he says, nodding at the frothy brown waters, "all of the tornadoes that have been happening — it just doesn't seem like a coincidence, you know?"

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ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Old Levees Tested Yet Again

Jun 2, 2019

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Floodwaters are receding in Tulsa, Okla., and 70-year-old levees that protect most of the town held. But as NPR's Frank Morris reports, now Tulsa and other communities flooded this year face a reckoning about how to shore up defenses before the next flood.

This month in Tulsa, Okla., opera singer Lucia Lucas made her U.S. debut. She also made history.

At the Tulsa Opera, Lucas sang the title role in Mozart's Don Giovanni. Mozart's character is a ruthless, macho womanizer. Lucas is a transgender woman with a rich baritone voice and is the first known trans woman to sing a principal role on an American opera stage. In a conversation with NPR's Ari Shapiro, Lucas said she doesn't want her performances to be entirely defined by this historical marker.

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NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with Col. Christopher Hussin, of Army Corps of Engineers in Oklahoma, about the state's levee system and the threat it faces from historic flooding.

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A surge of floodwater is moving from Oklahoma and into Arkansas. The rain has been relentless the past month and swollen rivers and tributaries are overwhelming some cities.

The Arkansas River has reached historic flood levels after weeks of relentless rain and tornadoes. The decades-old levee system is overwhelmed, and millions have been told to evacuate as waters have engulfed urban and rural areas alike. Reporter Frank Morris (@FrankNewsman) joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to discuss the latest from Tulsa, Oklahoma.

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Missouri's last health clinic that provides abortions is within days of losing its license. If it does, Missouri would become the only state in this country without an abortion provider.

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In Oklahoma, Tulsa and other nearby communities are in a tense standoff with the raging Arkansas River. The river has already flooded hundreds of homes and businesses.

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Record rainfall and flooding are causing all sorts of problems in Oklahoma. And more rain is predicted to make it even worse. In Tulsa, thousands of people have been evacuated.

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