Tribal Gaming Compacts

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Politcal Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director about a ruling from State Attorney General Mike Hunter telling the governor he can't keep funds from tribal gaming compacts in an escrow while he waits on a federal lawsuit, a drop in oil proces and Oklahoma energy company stocks could have a major impact on the state's budget and Governor Stitt calls on the health department to move forward with paperwork to file with the federal government for Medicaid expansion.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about Oklahoma's involvement in the upcoming Super Tuesday Presidential Primary, a call to the Attorney General on whether Governor Stitt can keep tribal gaming funds in an escrow without putting them in state coffers and Stitt signs his first bill of 2020 to increase transparency in private school money from public dollars.

 

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about a judges order to send the legal battle over tribal gaming compacts into mediation, Governor Stitt hiring a Washington, D.C. firm to re-imagine the structure of the state government and the battle of abortion bills at the state capitol between revoking the license of a doctor who performs abortion and an outright abolition of the practice.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the announcement from Mental Health and Substance Abuse Commissioner Terri White stepping down from her position and the House Speaker opposing Governor Stitt by saying the tribal gaming compacts automatically renewed for another 15 years on January 1st.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the Supreme Court declaring unconstitutional a bill requiring the top 25 alcohol brands make their products available to all distributors and justices hearing argument from supporters and opponents of an initiative petition to change the way Oklahoma redraws its district lines.

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Updated on January 17, 2020 at 3:13 p.m.

KOSU's Engagement Team has been reading and answering questions submitted to our recent survey on the tribal gaming compacts dispute. Below are answers to basic questions about tribal gaming compacts. This post will be updated as we get answers. 

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and, sitting in for Ryan Kiesel, ACLU Oklahoma Director of Policy and Advocacy Nicole McAfee about the impasse between the governor and the tribes over gaming compacts which now looks headed to court, dueling ballot initiatives to legalize recreational marijuana are getting ready for voter signatures, while medical marijuana provided the state with an additional $55M in its first full year on the books.

 

Flickr / Michael Kappel

State and tribal leaders are at odds over the gaming compact and how much money in fees Oklahoma should receive from tribal-run casinos. 

Oklahoma Governor Kevin Stitt said the 15-year-old tribal compact ended on January 1, 2020. But, the Oklahoma Gaming Association and tribal leaders have said the language within the compact outlines an automatic renewal.