Tribal Gaming Compact

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the Supreme Court declaring unconstitutional a bill requiring the top 25 alcohol brands make their products available to all distributors and justices hearing argument from supporters and opponents of an initiative petition to change the way Oklahoma redraws its district lines.

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Updated on January 17, 2020 at 3:13 p.m.

KOSU's Engagement Team has been reading and answering questions submitted to our recent survey on the tribal gaming compacts dispute. Below are answers to basic questions about tribal gaming compacts. This post will be updated as we get answers. 

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and, sitting in for Ryan Kiesel, ACLU Oklahoma Director of Policy and Advocacy Nicole McAfee about the impasse between the governor and the tribes over gaming compacts which now looks headed to court, dueling ballot initiatives to legalize recreational marijuana are getting ready for voter signatures, while medical marijuana provided the state with an additional $55M in its first full year on the books.

 

Flickr / Michael Kappel

State and tribal leaders are at odds over the gaming compact and how much money in fees Oklahoma should receive from tribal-run casinos. 

Oklahoma Governor Kevin Stitt said the 15-year-old tribal compact ended on January 1, 2020. But, the Oklahoma Gaming Association and tribal leaders have said the language within the compact outlines an automatic renewal.