Tribal Compacts

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By default, the U.S. Department of the Interior, the federal agency that governs agreements between states and tribes, has approved the gaming compacts Oklahoma Governor Kevin Stitt entered into in April with the Comanche Nation and the Otoe-Missouria Tribe.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the U.S. Department allowing gaming compacts between Governor Stitt and two tribes to move forward through inaction, the governor and his wife, Sarah hold a panel on race relations and a new poll shows a majority of Oklahomans support the protesters.

Governor Kevin Stitt and nine Oklahoma gaming tribes filed paperwork last Friday telling a federal judge why he should rule in their favor in the dispute over gaming compacts in the state.

It hinges on one statement, "this compact shall have a term which will expire on January 1, 2020," as well as "the compact shall automatically renew for successive additional fifteen-year terms."

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about lawmakers attaching strings to a new round of executive powers to the governor, legislative leaders announce a budget deal and Republicans push through a bill requiring notarization of absentee ballots.

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On Tuesday, Oklahoma Attorney General Mike Hunter issued an opinion saying Governor Kevin Stitt cannot enter into compacts with tribes that authorize gaming activity prohibited by state law.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the announcement from Mental Health and Substance Abuse Commissioner Terri White stepping down from her position and the House Speaker opposing Governor Stitt by saying the tribal gaming compacts automatically renewed for another 15 years on January 1st.

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Updated on January 17, 2020 at 3:13 p.m.

KOSU's Engagement Team has been reading and answering questions submitted to our recent survey on the tribal gaming compacts dispute. Below are answers to basic questions about tribal gaming compacts. This post will be updated as we get answers.