travel

The travel industry is reeling from the coronavirus. This week, three security screeners at the San Jose, Calif., airport tested positive for the virus, and others may have been exposed. That's fueling questions about how the TSA is protecting its employees and the public.

Union officials who represent the 45,000 or so screeners nationwide, and who come into contact with the public more than any other federal agency say they haven't been told much about how to protect themselves.

President Trump Thursday defended his new policy that, for 30 days, will bar most travelers arriving to the U.S. from much of Europe. Trump says coronavirus cases from the continent have been seeding outbreaks in the United States. The travel ban, he says, will save American lives.

As the cases of known coronavirus infections multiply worldwide, restrictions are increasing on international travel as well.

President Trump on Thursday defended new restrictions on travelers from most parts of Europe, a decision that angered allies and trading partners, was questioned by some public health experts and sent stock markets reeling.

Updated on March 6 at 3:45 p.m.

It's the season for colds and flus — and a newly identified respiratory disease, COVID-19.

To cut your risk of catching a respiratory illness on your next flight, experts offer two pieces of common-sense advice: Wash your hands frequently and keep a distance from people who are sick.

Where to sit to prevent getting sick

A 2018 study suggests that to minimize contact with other passengers, you should pick a window seat and stay put.

Updated at 3 p.m. ET on Feb. 7

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security says it will no longer allow New York state residents to enroll in programs intended to expedite international travel because of a state law that blocks immigration authorities from accessing motor vehicle records.

Starting Oct. 1, 2020, when the REAL ID law takes effect, if you plan to fly anywhere in the United States, the driver's license you show to security is probably going to need to have a star at the top. Essentially an enhanced driver's license, it will be required at the airport gate, unless you have another accepted form of ID. And officials are worried that one year out, many people don't yet have one.

Stefan Krasowski had a dream to visit every country on Earth before he turned 40. That took him to wondrous places, from the crystal blue crater lakes of Djibouti and the ancient Roman ruins of Tunisia to the foothills of the Himalayas in Bhutan.

And thanks to his considerable stockpile of credit cards, he was able to complete that dream and visit the one that eluded him — Syria. The moment his tourist visa was granted, after a two-year wait, he reached for his credit card.

"On one day's notice, I was able to be on a plane to Beirut and in Damascus by nightfall," he said.

If you are planning to travel more than 50 miles from home this weekend, whether by air or road, you won't be alone.

KOSU's Michael Cross spoke with AAA Oklahoma Senior Specialist for Public & Government Affairs Mark Madeja about the busy weekend for travel.

While, New York City and Anaheim, California top the  list of holiday destinations, Dallas/Fort Worth comes in at sixth in the top ten.

Updated at 3:30 p.m. ET

Americans may be celebrating 241 years of independence this Fourth of July, but they won't be liberated from their cars on what's forecast to be the "most traveled Independence Day holiday" ever.

AAA says that 44.2 million Americans are expected to travel 50 miles or more from home, with the vast majority on the road. That's an increase of nearly 3 percent from the year before, or more than a million people.

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