Tom Cole

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NPR's Scott Simon talks with Republican Rep. Tom Cole of Oklahoma about the government shutdown that began Saturday morning.

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The U.S. government is partly shut. The stroke of midnight came but no deal from Congress to keep the government open, prompting a shutdown on the first anniversary of the inauguration of President Donald Trump. The Senate is meeting to try again to reach a deal. The House met at 9. Before he headed to the Hill, Congressman Tom Cole, Republican of Oklahoma, joined us.

Congressman, thanks so much for being with us.

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Let's ask what people really talk about when they talk about chain migration.

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PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP: Chain migration is a total disaster which threatens our security and our economy.

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NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro talks to Republican Rep. Tom Cole of Oklahoma about the GOP's legislative agenda for 2018.

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Early Saturday morning, Senate Republicans passed a major tax overhaul bill. NPR's Michel Martin talks to Representative Tom Cole (R-Okla.) about what's shaping up to be the GOP's biggest legislative win this year.

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A bipartisan health care deal was introduced in the Senate. While there's a chance it could pass there, it faces a tougher time in the House. Rachel Martin talks to Rep. Tom Cole of Oklahoma.

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House Republicans said they will consider restrictions on bump stock gun accessories. Steve Inskeep talks with Republican Rep. Tom Cole of Oklahoma about his position.

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And let's hear the voice now. I have a Republican lawmaker. It's Congressman Tom Cole of the state of Oklahoma who's on the line with us. Congressman, thanks, as always, for joining us. We appreciate it.

TOM COLE: David, thank you.

Updated at 8:50 p.m. ET

President Trump is famous for requiring the loyalty of his subordinates. But it's the loyalty of Republican senators — not to him but to one of their own — that is the heart of a simmering showdown between the White House and Congress.

A growing number of GOP lawmakers appear to have had enough with what one has called the president's "public floggings" in recent days of Attorney General Jeff Sessions, a onetime senator from Alabama for served on Capitol Hill for two decades before joining the Trump administration.

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