tobacco

This month, the state of Virginia raised the legal age to purchase tobacco products and e-cigarettes to 21.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., says one of his "highest priorities" is to take on the leading cause of preventable death in the United States: smoking.

McConnell has sponsored a bill, along with Virginia Democratic Sen. Tim Kaine, that would increase the tobacco purchase age from 18 to 21.

Smokers who switched to e-cigarettes were much more likely to quit than people who used nicotine patches, gum or similar products, according to a large study.

The bad news: People who successfully quit tobacco were often hooked on e-cigarettes.

E-cigarettes are considered far less hazardous than the ones you light up. Still, American health officials worry about their addictive nature and lure for young people. But British health officials tend to look more favorably upon them.

Vaping by U.S. teenagers has reached epidemic levels, threatening to hook a new generation of young people on nicotine.

That's according to an unusual advisory issued Tuesday by U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams about the the dangers of electronic cigarette use among U.S. teenagers.

Lindsay Fox / EcigaretteReviewed.com

One Oklahoma Senator wants to ban vaping in schools.

Senator J.J. Dossett has filed a bill to ban vaping products in schools, including non-combustible devices and cartridges, regardless of if they contain nicotine.

The bill would extend the ban under the state’s Tobacco-Free Schools Act, which also bans tobacco products for public and private school buildings and vehicles.

Whitney Dinger, spokesperson for the Oklahoma Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust, says the state has been on trend with the increasing national vaping rates.

The Food and Drug Administration announced Thursday that it will seek a ban on the sale of menthol-flavored cigarettes.

The announcement came as the agency officially released a detailed plan to also restrict the sale of flavored electronic cigarettes. It also wants to ban flavored cigars.

Taxing soda is an increasingly popular approach to raising revenue while combating obesity, which affects 40 percent of American adults. But the sweetened-beverage industry is not about to go away quietly.

Ahead of the U.S. midterm elections, the soda industry poured millions of dollars into fighting taxes on sugary drinks. In recent years, it has been largely successful in shutting down new taxes, except in a handful of major cities.

Montana legislators expanded Medicaid by a very close vote in 2015. The measure passed with the condition that the expansion of Medicaid eligibility in the state would expire in 2019 unless lawmakers voted to reapprove it.

Jackie Fortier / StateImpact Oklahoma

Babies who begin life with a long hospital stay are especially vulnerable to secondhand smoke. That’s galvanized health officials at one children’s hospital to focus on laying aside stigma when they ask parents a simple question: ‘Do you smoke?’

One of those parents is Tabitha Majors, who has had a tough three weeks. She’s sitting in the neonatal intensive care unit at Children’s Hospital at the University of Oklahoma Medical Center in Oklahoma City, where her newborn son Brayden is recovering from surgery.

Lindsay Fox / EcigaretteReviewed.com

Newly published research suggests that more than 10 percent of Oklahomans vape–the highest rate in the country.

Researchers at the New York University School of Medicine found that states with strong tobacco-control laws, like smoke-free air rules and taxes on cigarettes have fewer e-cigarette users.

The study’s lead author Omar El-Shahawy says Oklahomans are more likely to try e-cigarettes because smoking is socially acceptable and allowed in a lot of locations.

Pages