terrorism

The self-declared Islamic State has released photos purportedly of its fighters destroying an ancient artifact in the Syrian city of Palmyra weeks after the Islamist extremists captured the city.

A "priceless" 2,000-year-old statue of a lion dating from the city's Roman heritage is seen being smashed in what Syrian antiquities director Maamoun Abdelkarim tells Agence-France Press is "the most serious crime [ISIS has] committed against Palmyra's heritage."

The suicide bomber who attacked a Shiite mosque in Kuwait last week, killing 27 people, was a Saudi national who flew into the neighboring Gulf nation hours before carrying out his deadly mission, Kuwaiti officials say. The self-declared Islamic State later claimed responsibility for the attack.

REUTERS/Emmanuel Foudrot

Another terrorist attack shook France this morning.

After the attacks at the newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris, the Lyon offices of Air Product, an American company that makes gas for industrial uses, was targeted.

This attack reopened old wounds — but also found new ways to shock the conscience of French people. A man was found decapitated, his head displayed on a fence of the factory, covered in inscriptions written in Arabic.

One person has been killed and at least 12 others injured in an attack on a gas factory in a small town in southeastern France. Officials say it was a terrorist attack: A flag of the self-declared Islamic State was reportedly found at the factory southeast of Lyon.

One suspect has been arrested over the attack, which also included an explosion at the facility operated by Air Products, an American company whose headquarters are in Pennsylvania. It's not yet certain whether he was acting alone.

How Norway threw away the term 'lone wolf'

Jun 20, 2015
Reuters/Heiko Junge/Pool

Norwegians watching news out of Charleston, South Carolina are reminded of another mass shooting four years ago. And they knew exactly what to call it. 

On July 22, 2011, after Anders Behring Breivik detonated a fertilizer bomb in front of a government building in Oslo, he gunned down scores of young people at a political summer camp on nearby Utøya island. Newspaper columnist Helene Skjeggestad was reminded of the attack when she saw social media about the Charleston church shooting.

The second and last day of the G-7 summit in Germany today will focus on climate change and terrorism.

The BBC reports:

"Chancellor Angela Merkel wants the group to reach an agreement on limiting global temperature rises. She also wants G-7 members to contribute to a fund for poor countries suffering the worst effects of climate change.

"There will also be talks on the threat from radical extremism with the leaders of Nigeria, Tunisia and Iraq.

KOSU's Michael Cross talks with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill about the cries of terrorism coming from GOP lawmakers and the Governor in the brutal beheading in Moore.


The U.S. has devoted billions of dollars to fighting terrorism overseas in the years since the Sept. 11 attacks.

The Justice Department is increasingly warning about the danger posed by radicals on American soil, and U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder wants prosecutors and FBI agents to devote more attention to the threat.

Nearly two decades ago, after the Oklahoma City bombing killed 168 people, the Justice Department launched a group to fight domestic terrorism.

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