State Supreme Court

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the commutation of more than 500 prisoners in state custody, the concerns growing from law enforcement and citizens over permitless carry and the State Supreme Court listening to the challenge of a controversial alcohol distribution law.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the Oklahoma Health Care Authority proposal to hire a Medicaid consultant to help the governor with his health care plan, the supporters of Yes on 802 to get Medicaid Expansion on the ballot file their petitions with the Secretary of State's office and House Speaker Charles McCall wants more oversight of state agencies by getting lawmakers to attend 40 state boards and commissions.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Director of Policy and Advocacy Nicole McAfee (who is sitting in for Ryan Kiesel) about the Legislative Compensation Board giving legislators a 35% pay raise to $47,000 a year, the Oklahoma Supreme Court rejecting a constitutional challenge against MAPS 4 and the state Republican Party is facing financial issues along with disputes from within its own party.

Quinton Chandler / StateImpact Oklahoma

At eight-years-old David Hall was taken from his mother’s house in Canadian County and placed into foster care. He had been abused most of his life and was struggling with PTSD.

Hall says he didn’t talk about being abused, he assumed it was normal.

“That’s not really something you talk about at school. When I was a kid, I talked about Scooby-Doo and things like that,” Hall said.

  

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the first anniversary of medical marijuana and Oklahoma already near the top nationwide in patient participation, Senator Inhofe vows to crack down on the private company reportedly leaving military families in disrepaired and dangerous homes at Tinker and other bases in the U.S. and the State Supreme Court refuses to hear a controversial alcohol bill preferring to send it to Oklahoma County District Court.

Courtesy: Spencer Bryan / Bryan & Terrill Law

When a private citizen’s civil rights are violated by the government, typically, they have the opportunity to sue, but under a recent Oklahoma Supreme Court decision, that might not be the case for inmates in Oklahoma jails and detention centers.

The group hoping to expand Medicaid in the state is celebrating a win in the Supreme Court.

Officials with Oklahomans Decide Healthcare feel like they succeeded in getting their message to justices who decided the case in record time.

Executive Director Amber England says, soon after Monday’s decision, Oklahomans were already contacting the group to help gather 178,000 signatures in 90 days.

A campaign to expand government health insurance to more low income Oklahomans overcame its first legal hurdle Tuesday. The Oklahoma Supreme Court ruled the effort can move forward just hours after hearing oral arguments.

Oklahoma is one of 14 states that has not expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act. A group called Oklahomans Decide Healthcare hopes to change that by gathering enough signatures to put a constitutional amendment on the ballot in 2020.

The summary, or “gist,” of the signature-gathering petition reads:

Jacob McCleland / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

More than a dozen members of the liquor and wine industry filed a lawsuit this week asking the Oklahoma Supreme Court to stop a law that — they say, will disrupt their business.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and siting in for Ryan Kiesel is ACLU Oklahoma Political and Advocacy Director Nicole McAfee about the State Supreme Court overturning a law limiting abortion-inducing medication, Governor Stitt signing a bill forcing abortion clinics to put up signs saying a drug induced abortion is reversible and the governor vetoing a bill giving overtime pay to state workers making less than $31,000 a year.

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