State Question 792

Jacob McCleland / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

More than a dozen members of the liquor and wine industry filed a lawsuit this week asking the Oklahoma Supreme Court to stop a law that — they say, will disrupt their business.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks to Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about a challenge to a new alcohol law requiring the manufacturers of the top 25 brands to offer products to all distributors, recent flooding brings national attention in the form of visits from Vice President Mike Pence and Democratic Presidential candidate Beto O'Rourke and the Cherokee Nation elects Chuck Hoskin, Jr. to be its next Principal Chief.

David Shankbone / Wikimedia Commons

You might notice something new when you walk into your local liquor store on Monday, October First.

The changes are coming after Oklahomans overwhelmingly supported State Question 792 back in November of 2016.

While liquor stores are getting extra options, big box stores like Wal-Mart are also getting to sell cold beer and wine which raises concens among most owners.

KOSU's Michael Cross got a chance to talk to Retail Liquor Association of Oklahoma President Bryan Kerr about what people should expect with the new law.

As KOSU and KGOU began crafting ideas for our collaborative election project Oklahoma Engaged, we were interested in several forms of storytelling. This included informative and in-depth radio stories and video profiles of folks in a south Oklahoma City district.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill about State Question 792 to put strong beer and wine in grocery stores as well as looking at any state legislative races which has their attention.

The trio also discusses the race for Oklahoma County Sheriff after an audit of mismanagement for the incumbent and accusations of fake endorsements from the challenger as well as predictions on voter turnout.

Supporters and opponents of several state questions on the ballot in Oklahoma have spent nearly $3 million to air television ads on the issues ahead of the November election.

Data released Thursday by the Center for Public Integrity show more than 3,800 ads have aired on proposals to impose a 1 percent sales tax for education, restrict oversight of farming and ranching and change the state's alcohol laws and criminal justice system.

Purman Wilson Collection / Oklahoma Historical Society

Oklahomans are considering some of the biggest changes to the state’s liquor laws since the end of prohibition. If approved, State Question 792 would amend the state constitution and alter a system with roots planted during the days of Indian Territory.

“There he is!” Bryan Kerr said with a laugh, as he greeted a customer at his liquor store in Moore. ”You’re always showing up at exactly the right time.”

The customer navigated through rows of bottles at Moore Liquor, while Kerr slipped outside. He took a few steps to an adjoining storefront to another business he owns: Party Moore.

“A lot of people mistake it for like a Party Galaxy or Party City. It is not that,” Kerr said as he cracked open the store’s door. “It is a party store that is exclusively built for parties that have alcohol in them.”

Jacob McCleland / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

Supporters of a state question that would change Oklahoma’s alcohol laws launched their campaign today Wednesday. The group Yes On 792 is advocating on behalf of a ballot questionthat would allow convenience stores to sell full strength beer and wine. Liquor stores would be able to sell cold beer.