Oklahoma Department of Corrections

Kate Carlton Greer / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

Oklahoma’s Department of Corrections begins moving inmates Tuesday to a newly leased private facility in far western Oklahoma, where state employees will run the prison. The agreement between the state and Corrections Corporation of America is a first in Oklahoma’s prison system.

SUE OGROCKI / AP

The Oklahoma House of Representatives reversed itself Wednesday on a bill it defeated 48-44 on Monday. The new vote approves modifications of the requirements to become the head of the state Department of Corrections.

Under the bill’s language, the agency director no longer needs a master’s degree or five years experience in corrections. The changes make the Department of Corrections’ current Interim Director Joe Allbaugh eligible.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the local Sigma Alpha Epsilon alumni hiring attorney Stephen Jones and a Senate bill to ban teachers from paying union dues out of their paycheck.

The trio also discuss documents released by the Department of Corrections on the botched execution of Clayton Lockett, the lack of documents from the Governor's office and Lt. Gov. Todd Lamb admits he has his eye on the Governor's office in 2018.

Headlines for Monday, December 15, 2014:

  • Policy changes at the Department of Corrections result in the early release of hundreds of violent criminals and sex offenders. (Oklahoma Watch)

  • The architects who built the Devon Tower want to build a new 27-story building in downtown. (NewsOK)

  • A bill under consideration this spring allows lawmakers to carry guns anywhere including college campuses and the State Capitol. (Tulsa World)

Nearly 50 years since it was first designed by social psychology students at Harvard, the electronic monitoring device has become a significant part of the criminal justice system. More popularly associated with law-breaking celebrities like Paris Hilton or Martha Stewart, the electronic ankle bracelet has been used to track hundreds of thousands of sex offenders, DUI offenders, people free on bail and others.

But its current use is not quite what its inventors had in mind.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the governor choosing to sign or veto a bill bringing parents and educators into the decision of reading retention for 3rd graders, concrete is falling into offices at the State Capitol, the governor approves a $13M supplemental for the Department of Corrections and the co-founder of the Sooner Tea Party creates a parody website poking fun at the senator he's accused of blackmailing.

  In This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks to Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about a $13M supplemental budget bill under consideration in the State Capitol, the State Treasurer levels warning after Kansas bond rating drops, budget talks appear stalled with just three weeks left in the session and House Speaker Jeff Hickman gets elected to a full two year term.

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