New Hampshire

Updated at 3:22 p.m. ET

After a fifth-place finish in Iowa, Amy Klobuchar's head-turning performance in New Hampshire on Tuesday night has some calling the Minnesota senator "the comeback kid."

Updated at 10:20 a.m. ET

The finish at the top in New Hampshire looked a lot like the finish last week in Iowa, this time with Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders leading the way and former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg finishing a close second.

But from the No. 3 spot on down there were some pretty big surprises, including the rise of Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar and disappointing finishes for Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren and former Vice President Joe Biden.

Here are six takeaways from what happened last night:

Updated at 12:49 p.m. ET

Democrats are going to try again.

After the Iowa results meltdown, New Hampshire takes center stage Tuesday night. This election is run by the secretary of state's office and not the state party. It's also a more-straightforward primary (with a couple kinks we explain below) rather than a complicated, math-heavy caucus.

Tonight at 6 p.m., KOSU presents “America, Are We Ready? The New Hampshire Primary,” a special live national call-in program hosted by WNYC’s Brian Lehrer and New Hamphire Public Radio's Laura Knoy.

As everyone awaits the night’s results for the New Hampshire Primary, Brian and Laura will talk with callers from around the country about this night and the process for electing our presidents.

This program will preempt Marketplace and The Daily for the day.

After Iowa's debacle, the Democratic presidential nominating contest has moved to New Hampshire.

Follow NPR's coverage for the latest updates and then, when the polls close in the Granite State Tuesday night, live results and analysis.

Updated at 11:42 a.m. ET

In the final sprint before Tuesday's New Hampshire primary, Democratic presidential candidates are taking a more sharply negative tone about their rivals than they have up until now.

The top target is former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg. He faced a barrage of attacks as the other Democratic candidates seek to blunt his momentum from a strong showing in Iowa.

The Democratic candidates for president debated once again Friday night, just days after the Iowa caucuses and days before the New Hampshire primary on Tuesday.

The stakes were high for each of the seven candidates who debated. Here are five takeaways from the debate:

1. Urgency is setting in for the candidates

After a flawed Iowa caucus process, the Senate acquittal of President Trump and a dramatic State of the Union address — all in the past five days — Friday night brings the eighth Democratic presidential debate.

A flurry of qualifying polls released Sunday has put tech entrepreneur Andrew Yang back on the Democratic debate stage.

Yang is the seventh candidate to qualify for the Feb. 7 debate in Manchester, N.H., which is just four days ahead of the primary there.

Amidst fears about cybersecurity and the spread of disinformation, New Hampshire's first-in-the-nation presidential primary — along with the guardian of that tradition - is under scrutiny like never before.

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