Mike Hunter

Churches around Oklahoma have canceled or scaled back services for Sunday, March 15. However, Oklahoma's Attorney General Mike Hunter issued a statement Saturday, March 14 saying that even though churches are canceling, there is nothing that currently allows the state or local government to force such closures.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Politcal Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director about a ruling from State Attorney General Mike Hunter telling the governor he can't keep funds from tribal gaming compacts in an escrow while he waits on a federal lawsuit, a drop in oil proces and Oklahoma energy company stocks could have a major impact on the state's budget and Governor Stitt calls on the health department to move forward with paperwork to file with the federal government for Medicaid expansion.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about Oklahoma's involvement in the upcoming Super Tuesday Presidential Primary, a call to the Attorney General on whether Governor Stitt can keep tribal gaming funds in an escrow without putting them in state coffers and Stitt signs his first bill of 2020 to increase transparency in private school money from public dollars.

 

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill about Attorney General Mike Hunter filing a lawsuit against major opioid distributors in the state, the governor's task force on corrections reform releases its report while also asking for more time to come up with detailed plans to reduce the state's prison population and two initiative petitions to make recreational marijuana legal in the state are getting push back from the state's medical marijuana industry.

 

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about a push to change the way Oklahomans draw political districts by putting it in the hands of an independent committee rather than politicians, the Oklahoma County Sheriff plans to hand over control of the jail to a newly formed trust whether it's ready or not and the attorney general meets with tribal leaders to discuss gaming compacts.

The nation's response to the deadly opioid epidemic has been broadly bipartisan, but deep divides have emerged over a settlement plan offered last month by Purdue Pharma, the maker of Oxycontin.

Democratic state attorneys general have generally panned the deal, which would force Purdue's owners, member of the Sackler family, to give up control of their company while paying roughly $3 billion in cash from their personal fortunes.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the Attorney General's announcement saying despite a Tenth Cicuit ruling, women in Oklahoma don't have the right to go topless, also the AG's cease and desist order against at-home rape kit companies he says aren't admissable in courts and a bipartisan group of lawmakers come out in support of a California law allowing college athletes to get endorsements like the pros.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the announcement by Higher Education Chancellor Glen Johnson to retire from the position effective at the end of next year, AG Mike Hunter announces the state is hiring a Michigan law firm for $250,000 to deal with tribal gaming compacts and the Department of Corrections locks down state prisons after gang-related violence kills one inmate and injures dozens of others.

Chris Landsberger / Pool

An Oklahoma judge has ruled that drugmaker Johnson & Johnson helped ignite the state’s opioid crisis by deceptively marketing painkillers, and must pay $572 million to the state.

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