impeachment

South Carolina's Republican Party formally censured Rep. Tom Rice on Saturday over his vote earlier this month to impeach former President Donald Trump for inciting the crowd that stormed the U.S. Capitol.

Rice, who represents South Carolina's 7th Congressional District, was one of 10 House Republicans who broke ranks and voted with Democrats to impeach.

With just over a week before his second impeachment trial begins, former President Donald Trump's legal defense team is in flux after at least two key departures.

Two of his lead impeachment lawyers, Butch Bowers and Deborah Barbier, have parted ways with Trump, a source familiar with the matter told NPR. The South Carolina-based lawyers' departure was a "mutual decision," the person said, but no explanation was given.

No one expected him to ride quietly into the sunset. But when Donald J. Trump vacated the White House — freshly impeached for a second time, and still insisting on the lie that the election was stolen from him by massive voter fraud — it was an open question as to how much influence he would still wield within the GOP.

The forming narrative among those who don't want a Senate impeachment trial for former President Donald Trump is along the lines of, "He's out of office. What's the point?"

Others are going so far as to claim that conducting an impeachment trial for Trump now that he's out of office is unconstitutional.

Maryland Democrat Jamie Raskin is preparing to lead the second Senate trial of Donald Trump with two clear arguments in mind: Trump was responsible for the attack on the Capitol on Jan. 6, and the Constitution allows Congress to hold the former president accountable through impeachment.

Updated 5:40 p.m. ET

After senators were sworn in Tuesday afternoon as jurors in the impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump, Sen. Rand Paul quickly pressed for a vote to force lawmakers on the record over the issue of the trial's constitutionality.

The Senate voted 55-45 to reject the Kentucky Republican's argument that the impeachment trial is unconstitutional because Trump is no longer in office.

Democrats on Monday evening delivered an article of impeachment from the House to the Senate to mark officially the start of the second impeachment trial against former President Donald Trump. The article accuses Trump of inciting the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol.

The Senate trial will begin Feb. 9. Assuming that both Senate independents vote for impeachment, Democrats will need the support of 17 Republicans.

Updated at 4:58 p.m. ET

Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., will preside over former President Donald Trump's trial in the Senate, a Senate source told NPR. Leahy, 80, is the president pro tempore of the Senate, a constitutional role given to the longest-serving lawmaker in the majority party. The president pro tempore is third in the line of presidential succession, after the vice president and House speaker.

Updated at 7:55 p.m. ET

At about 7 p.m. ET Monday, House impeachment managers delivered to the Senate an article of impeachment against former President Donald Trump, a move that prompts preparations for a historic trial.

As the Senate prepares to try former President Donald Trump and potentially bar him from again holding office, some Republican lawmakers criticized the idea of trying an out-of-office president, while Democrats worried about distracting from President Biden's agenda.

The single article of impeachment against Trump for inciting the Jan. 6 insurrection at the Capitol is slated to be sent to the Senate Monday. His trial is scheduled to begin the week of Feb. 8 with the full Senate required to meet six days a week until the trial is complete.

Pages