Homelessness

This story is part of a series looking at places around the U.S. that are successfully reducing homelessness. Check out all of our stories.


Across the U.S., more than a half million people have been identified as homeless.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about nearly $600M extra for the state to allocate in the coming fiscal year, incoming Governor Kevin Stitt nominate Blayne Arthur to be the state's first female Secretary of the Agriculture and a federal judge declares an OKC ordinance banning panhandling in certain medians constitutional.

facebook.com/CurbsideOKC

The Curbside Chronicle is teaming up with local artists to celebrate the holidays for a good cause.

Until December 23rd, vendors are selling wrapping paper with custom designs from local artists including Flaming Lips frontman Wayne Coyne as part of the Homeless Alliance program.

Curbside Chronicle Director Ranya Forgotson says this helps vendors as they work toward the goal of ending homelessness for themselves.

After years of economic boom driven by rapid tech growth, voters in the San Francisco Bay Area will decide this November if big corporations should be taxed to help pay for issues that have only gotten worse as business has thrived: housing and transportation.

The campaigns are an acknowledgment of the strain that rapid job growth has levied on public transportation and housing affordability in many cities.

Business groups who oppose the tax hikes argue the measures would give companies a reason to expand elsewhere, or even worse, leave the region altogether.

You're reading NPR's weekly roundup of education news.

Education is a top issue in the midterms

From the 36 gubernatorial races to some key state congressional races, education will be a major issue on Election Day. We've reported previously on a record number of educators who are themselves running. There were teacher walkouts in six states this year. That issue alone has gotten people mobilized.

There's something else that's bringing education to the midterms: Betsy DeVos, the polarizing education secretary.

Fourteen-year-old Caydden Zimmerman's school days start early and end late.

He has a 90-minute bus ride to get from the homeless shelter where he is staying in Boise, Idaho, to his middle school. He wakes up at 5:45 a.m., quickly brushes his teeth and smooths some gel in his hair, and then he dashes downstairs to catch his school bus.

Ouida "Jeannie" Eugenia Kaulaity lived in her truck for years. Some might consider homelessness a struggle, but Jeannie came to the StoryCorps mobile booth to talk to her case worker Marty Peercy about the ways she has been blessed by the homeless community in Oklahoma City.

This story was produced for KOSU by Rachel Hubbard and Dustin Drew, with interviews recorded at the StoryCorps mobile booth in Oklahoma City in early 2018. Locally recorded stories air Wednesdays during Morning Edition and All Things Considered on KOSU.

The StoryCorps mobile booth was in Oklahoma City in early 2018, and we're bringing you some of the stories that were recorded here. Locally recorded stories will air Wednesdays during Morning Edition and All Things Considered on KOSU.

Yvonne Munoz was angry when she arrived at ReMerge, a prison diversion program for women and mothers. She felt like the world had it out for her. But after she graduated the program, she realized she had something specific to give back: leadership from her own experience.

Fewer Homeless Veterans On LA's Streets

Jul 16, 2018

The lack of affordable housing is at the forefront of the homeless crisis in Los Angeles County. But the city's annual point-in-time homeless count, released on June 1, showed that the veteran homeless population had declined 18 percent.

The StoryCorps mobile booth was in Oklahoma City in early 2018, and we're bringing you some of the stories that were recorded here. Locally recorded stories will air Wednesdays during Morning Edition and All Things Considered on KOSU.

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