guns

New York state has some of the toughest gun laws in the country. Compliance with those laws is another matter.

New York passed a broad package of gun regulations after the school shooting in Newtown, Conn., despite the objections of hunters and gun rights advocates. Now it appears that many gun owners are refusing to comply with a key provision that requires the registration of so-called assault weapons.

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After last night's shooting in Lafayette, La., Governor Bobby Jindal also said this...

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Each year, convicted felons get thousands of weapons from licensed gun dealers. They skirt the mandatory background checks by having people who do qualify fill out the paperwork for them.

Now, the settlement of a lawsuit over a tragic murder-suicide in Kansas has made it easier to sue gun dealers who allow these "straw purchases" with a wink and a nod.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill talk about Governor Fallin vetoing a bill to keep cities from banning guns at events, but signs a bill allowing for guns at schools as well as two $25 million bonds for the American Indian Cultural Center in Oklahoma City and the OK POP museum in Tulsa.

The trio also discuss calls by Republicans to fire a member of the state GOP who pleaded guilty to domestic abuse and for the first time this fiscal year, general revenue collections fell below estimates.

For the first time in nearly two decades, federal money is beginning to flow into gun violence research. And there's growing momentum behind creating a reliable national reporting database for firearm injuries and deaths.

On the front lines at the Los Angeles County+USC Medical Center, one of the top trauma hospitals on the West Coast, researchers like Dr. Demetrios Demetriades hope to get a better picture of the scope of the problem, so states can better target their prevention programs.

The Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission appears to be backing away from a proposal to allow the sale of alcohol at some gun shows.

On Friday, the staff of the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission recommended that commissioners vote to withdraw the plan.

NPR's John Burnett filed this report for our Newscast unit:

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