Guantanamo Bay

WikiLeaks was already established as an online outlet for posting secret documents from anonymous leakers well before its massive disclosure of U.S. government and military information in 2010. That was the year WikiLeaks' Australian founder, Julian Assange, faced allegations that led to his seeking asylum in Ecuador's London embassy.

Here is a timeline of WikiLeaks' key disclosures and related developments.

Updated at 6:10 a.m. ET

President Trump on Tuesday signed an executive order to keep open the U.S. military prison at Guantanamo Bay, after pledging during the campaign to "load it up with some bad dudes."

A risky move by one of the defense teams has led to unusual drama in the seemingly endless pretrial proceedings of the Sept. 11war crimes case.

Defense attorney Walter Ruiz decided to roll the dice and challenge the prosecution to prove that his client, alleged Sept. 11 money man Mustafa al-Hawsawi, should be tried as a war criminal.

The U.S. has released 10 prisoners from Guantanamo Bay to the Arab nation of Oman, reducing the detainee population to 45 in the waning days of the Obama administration.

The freed prisoners were not identified by name or nationality, though the Oman News Agency, citing the country's Foreign Ministry, reported that the 10 had arrived in the country on Monday for "temporary residence."

Since the Obama administration hasn't been able to close the prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, the push has been on to transfer as many of the cleared detainees as possible before Donald Trump becomes president.

The Pentagon announced on Thursday that four prisoners have been released and sent to Saudi Arabia, where they are expected to participate in a rehabilitation program.

Among the many unknowns hanging over this presidential transition: the fate of the U.S. military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. President Obama has sworn to close it; President-elect Trump wants to fill it up again.

Obama has been promising the closure will happen since his second day in office in 2009. In February, he repeated that pledge one more time, saying, "I'm absolutely committed to closing the detention facility at Guantanamo."

That same day, at a campaign rally in Sparks, Nevada, Donald Trump was promising the opposite.

The U.S. transferred two Guantanamo Bay detainees to Senegal on Monday, bringing the population of the military prison in Cuba down to 89.

The two detainees, Salem Abdu Salam Ghereby and Omar Khalif Mohammed Abu Baker Mahjour Umar, are Libyans. They had been held at the military prison for 14 years without being charged.

President Obama wants his visit to Havana to open up American ties with Cuba. He also wants to close the detention facility at Guantanamo Bay, on the southern tip of the island.

Does that mean his next move might be to return the whole naval base?

President Obama has been talking about closing the detention facility at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, since he ran for president in 2008.

Now, eight years later, his administration has put out a plan to make it happen.

The plan is to transfer some of the remaining detainees to other countries and those who can't be transferred would be moved to a facility in the U.S. And that's the part of the plan many in Congress are railing against.

President Obama wants to finally make good on one of his signature campaign promises: closing the detention facility at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. The Republican-controlled Congress is unlikely to go along, but the debate has raised another question: If the prison closes, what would happen to the naval base itself?

The Claim

Texas Sen. Ted Cruz warned about handing over the entire base in a debate this month on CNN.

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