gay rights

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Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant has signed a controversial "religious freedom" bill into law.

The legislation, HB 1523, promises that the state government will not punish people who refuse to provide services to people because of a religious opposition to same-sex marriage, extramarital sex or transgender people.

Supporters say it protects the rights of people who are opposed to homosexuality but who now live in a country where same-sex marriage is a legal right.

Opponents say the law amounts to a state sanction for open discrimination.

Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal, facing mounting pressure from corporations with interests in his state, said Monday that he will veto a controversial "religious liberties" bill.

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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Facing a sharp backlash over his remarks in a recent TV interview, boxer and politician Manny Pacquiao has apologized for saying that people who are in gay relationships are "worse than animals."

Here's the famous boxer's apology:

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill about the upcoming legislative session including any possible predictions, a proposal to give $10,000 raises to teachers and an initiative to put criminal justice reform on the ballot this November.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

facebook.com/FreedomOklahoma.org

Gay rights advocates in Oklahoma are calling on Republican leaders to repudiate more than two dozen bills that they say unfairly target members of the LGBT community.

Freedom Oklahoma Executive Director Troy Stevenson said Tuesday that 18 bills remain active from last year. Another nine have been filed ahead of the 2016 session that he says discriminate against the rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people.

We usually think about adoption as a relationship solely between parents and children.

It's not.

Before same-sex marriage became legal across the United States, some couples would become parent and child — just on paper — to get rights they were otherwise denied.

That's what Sergio Cervetti and Ken Rinker of Doylestown, Pa., did years after meeting in the fall of 1965. Rinker was 19 at the time and just back from a trip to Europe with his student dance troupe. He says he felt invigorated by Cervetti, who was five years older and a composer.

Lawyers for a lesbian mother in Alabama are asking the U.S. Supreme Court to reverse a decision by Alabama's highest court refusing to recognize her parental rights under an adoption granted in Georgia.

V.L. and E.L., as they are referred to in court papers, are two women who were in a committed relationship for nearly 17 years. Although state law prevented them from being married, V.L. took E.L.'s name.

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