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By default, the U.S. Department of the Interior, the federal agency that governs agreements between states and tribes, has approved the gaming compacts Oklahoma Governor Kevin Stitt entered into in April with the Comanche Nation and the Otoe-Missouria Tribe.

twitter.com/GovStitt

The U.S. Department of the Interior has approved gaming compacts Oklahoma Governor Kevin Stitt entered into with two tribes in April.

The 45-day deadline for the Department of the Interior to approve the gaming compacts between Stitt and the Comanche Nation and the Otoe-Missouria Tribe ended on June 7. The department took no action, which means the agreements can take effect once they're published in the Federal Register.

Governor Kevin Stitt and nine Oklahoma gaming tribes filed paperwork last Friday telling a federal judge why he should rule in their favor in the dispute over gaming compacts in the state.

It hinges on one statement, "this compact shall have a term which will expire on January 1, 2020," as well as "the compact shall automatically renew for successive additional fifteen-year terms."

Update at 6:05 p.m. ET Thursday:

Sports bookmaker FanDuel has changed course and decided to pay out massive sums for several bets made on an erroneous line in a football game last weekend. The company originally said they would only pay out customers on what was supposed to be the correct betting line.

In a statement sent to NPR on Thursday, the company said:

Now that the Supreme Court says it's OK, states are free to legalize betting on sports if they want to. As a once under-the-table economy moves into the open, it creates some large business opportunities — and the potential for millions in new tax revenues.

Ryan LaCroix / KOSU

Update 4:22 p.m.

The state’s largest teachers union says the teacher walkout will continue next week despite the Senate passing two revenue-raising measures today. The Oklahoma Education Association also laid out new demands it says lawmakers must meet for teachers to return to the classroom.

Jacob McCleland / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

Oklahoma teachers continued to rally Wednesday at the state capitol, the third day of a planned teacher walkout. Educators filled the capitol to capacity, urging lawmakers to hear their demands for more education funding.

The Oklahoma Education Association, the state's largest teachers union, wants more money for the classroom and it identified legislation they think would achieve that. One is a bill allowing ball and dice games in casinos, another would repeal some capital gains exemptions.

After passing teacher pay raises and providing revenue to fund them, some lawmakers thought the teacher walkout would be short lived. However, as the walkout closes in on its fourth day, some are wondering what the options are to provide more revenue to fund education and other core state services.

Following are some of the options lawmakers have talked about in the past that could still be on the table. They have varying levels of support, which is tricky when considering the super majority new revenue measures require. 

Jacob McCleland / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

Updated 7:11 p.m.

As House members were preparing to adjourn, Republican Majority Floor Leader Jon Echols announced that he had just been notified by the state Senate that they would hear House Bill 1013XX on Thursday. 

UPDATED: 11:14 p.m.

A revenue package that included several tax increases passed the Oklahoma House of Representatives Monday night, the first time a tax increase has passed the House in 28 years.

It was a late night for the Oklahoma House of Representatives in an effort to avoid a teacher and public employee walkout next week. After several failed attempts over the last 17 months to find funding for a teacher pay raise, Democrats and Republicans struck a deal over the weekend.

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