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Facebook says it will continue to allow political ads that target the social media platform's users, sticking to its position despite concerns about the potential impact on the upcoming presidential election. Federal Election Commissioner Ellen Weintraub sharply criticized the policy, saying Facebook's "weak plan suggests the company has no idea how seriously it is hurting democracy."

Updated at 11:40 a.m. ET

Facebook says it's banning many types of misleading videos from its site, in a push against deepfake content and online misinformation campaigns.

Facebook's new ban targets videos that are manipulated to make it appear someone said words they didn't actually say. The company won't allow videos on its site if they've been either edited or computer-generated in ways that the average person couldn't detect.

Updated at 12:15 p.m. ET

Facebook is changing user policies for its social media platforms to explicitly ban disinformation about and ads trying to discourage participation in the 2020 census, the company announced on its website Thursday.

The company says it plans to enforce these specific bans on all users, including politicians — a departure from previous comments from Facebook officials who said the company did not want to restrict politicians' speech on its platforms.

Many of the youngest eligible voters in the U.S. have yet to graduate high school.

Three high school seniors from Putnam City High School in Oklahoma City —17-year-old Nathaniel Black, 17-year-old Jamie King and 18-year-old Jessica Jones — all say they plan to vote in the 2020 presidential election.

This trio isn’t the only group of high schoolers in the country taking their civic duty to vote seriously.

Updated at 4:20 p.m. ET Wednesday

California's attorney general is seeking a court order to force Facebook to give up information about how the company handled user data.

Attorney General Xavier Becerra said Facebook has resisted and even ignored California's attempts to get information from the company as part of an investigation launched by his office over whether the company misused data. He said Facebook has not responded to the subpoena his office has issued.

Updated at 6:04 p.m. ET

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey announced that his social media platform will stop running political ads, citing online ads' "significant risks to politics." Facebook has been criticized for allowing deceptive political ads.

"We've made the decision to stop all political advertising on Twitter globally. We believe political message reach should be earned, not bought," Dorsey tweeted late Wednesday afternoon.

He explained his reasons in a long thread of tweets.

Facebook has agreed to pay a £500,000 (about $643,000) fine to the U.K.'s Information Commissioner's Office for its role in the Cambridge Analytica scandal. The fine was originally issued in October 2018, as part of the ICO's investigation into the use of social media data for political purposes.

Updated at 10:48 a.m. ET

Facebook unveiled a new way of delivering news to users Friday, in the latest change to its approach to journalism. The company says Facebook News will connect users to stories that are personalized for their interests and also highlight "the most relevant national stories of the day."

Facebook News is being tested with a subset of mobile app users starting Friday, the company says. And Facebook has hired a small team of journalists who will pick the stories that show up in one of the sections of the app, called Today's Stories.

Updated at 1:57 p.m. ET

Facing increased questions over whether Facebook can be trusted to protect its users, CEO Mark Zuckerberg told lawmakers Wednesday that the company will pull out of its controversial digital currency project if U.S. regulators don't approve it.

Zuckerberg said the social network would leave the nonprofit body governing the new currency, Libra, if other members decided to go ahead without regulatory approval.

By my count, Brittany Kaiser mentions the TV show Mad Men four times in her new memoir Targeted. But her story tracks closer to that of another big TV show — Breaking Bad.

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