Electoral College

Aside from having proposals for programs they would like to implement, Democratic presidential candidates have proposals for how they would like government to function.

The primary campaign has brought forth proposals to change all three branches of government, potentially impacting how laws are passed, the size and function of the Supreme Court, and how presidents are elected.

Below, we summarize how the 2020 Democratic contenders want to change U.S. governance in these three areas.

The Supreme Court may be eager to portray itself as an apolitical institution. But this term, political questions writ large are knocking at the high court door.

The upcoming term will almost surely be a march to the right on almost every issue that is a flashpoint in American society. Among them: abortion, guns, gay rights, the separation of church and state, immigration and presidential power.

President Hillary Clinton?

That might have been the result of the 2016 presidential election — if the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact were in effect.

With a state Senate vote Tuesday, Nevada is close to becoming the latest state to drop the traditional practice of awarding all its electors to the presidential candidate who won the state. Instead, Nevada would award its six electors to whomever receives the most votes across the entire country.

At a time of deep disenchantment with the political system, dramatic proposals to upend how politics are conducted are starting to resonate with voters.

Six Democratic 2020 presidential candidates have recently expressed support for abolishing the Electoral College. U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren said in a recent Mississippi town hall that “everybody ought to have to come and ask for your vote,” and South Bend, Indiana Mayor Steve Buttigieg pushed for the college’s elimination on the first day of his presidential exploratory campaign.

Most people in America want the Electoral College gone, and they want to select a president based on who gets the most votes nationally, polls say.

Democratic presidential candidates are weighing in too.

"Every vote matters," said Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., in Mississippi on Monday. "And the way we can make that happen is that we can have national voting and that means get rid of the Electoral College."

That line garnered one of her largest roars of applause for the evening.

Gregg says that change would radicalize politics.

An attempt at an Electoral College workaround is gaining momentum in the Mountain West.

Democrats in Colorado and New Mexico are pushing ahead with legislation to pledge their 14 collective electoral votes to the winner of the national popular vote — no matter who wins each state.

The plan only goes into effect if the law passes in states representing an electoral majority. That threshold is 270 votes, which is the same number needed to win the presidency.

Donald J. Trump will be the next president of the United States.

That's been the case since Nov. 8, when Trump won 306 electoral votes, despite losing the national popular vote to Hillary Clinton by nearly 3 million.

And on Monday, the result was ratified by Electoral College voters, who gathered in state capitols across the United States to formally vote for president.

Jacob McCleland / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

All seven of Oklahoma’s electors voted at the state capitol Monday in favor of Donald Trump. The Republican president-elect won 65 percent of the popular vote in Oklahoma and carried every county in the state.

David Oldham, an elector from Tulsa, said he took his role seriously. He examined news reports to determine whether he thought Trump could serve as president, including Russian hacking allegations. He said there’s no proof Trump was involved in the hacks.

Electors from the 50 states will convene in their state capitols Monday and cast their votes for president. Republican Donald Trump is assured of a victory, unless there is a massive — and totally unexpected — defection by the electors who are pledged to support him.

Here are five things you should know about the Electoral College:

1. How do you get to be an elector?

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