domestic violence

Oklahoma Domestic Violence Fatality Review Board

Measures taken to escape COVID-19 are making it harder for some domestic violence victims to find safety from their abusers. In addition to being isolated, victims may begin experiencing more severe violence.

United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres, citing a sharp rise in domestic violence amid global coronavirus lockdowns, called on governments around the world to make addressing the issue a key part of their response to the pandemic.

Speaking late Sunday, Guterres said "violence is not confined to the battlefield."

"For many women and girls, the threat looms largest where they should be safest — in their own homes," he said, appealing "for peace at home — and in homes — around the world."

  

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the passage of MAPS4 by a wide margin garnering more than 70% of those voting, the Pardon and Parole Board sees a 118% increase in the number of docketed cases with commutations jumping 426% since 2018 and Governor Stitt gives an extension to his criminal justice reform task force.

 

Updated at 4:15 p.m. ET

The WNBA has suspended Los Angeles Sparks guard Riquna Williams for 10 games without pay over a domestic violence incident in which she allegedly attacked a former girlfriend.

Williams was arrested in April and charged with two felony counts after authorities in Florida say she punched the woman in the head and then threatened another person with a gun.

Many women have a hard time admitting — even to themselves — that they're being abused by their husband or partner. Suzanne Dubus' first husband hit her, but still, she didn't initially identify herself as a victim of abuse.

"I attributed it to alcohol," Dubus says. "I knew that his father abused his mother. And I thought, 'Well, this is just poor learning, and I can help him with this.' "

Editor's note: This article contains images of assault that some may find disturbing.

The Kansas City Chiefs cut Kareem Hunt, one of the NFL's top running backs, on Friday, hours after the release of a video showing him attacking a woman.

Now, fans are asking a familiar set of questions: What did the NFL know about the domestic violence incident, and did it try to conceal what happened?

In 2014, an Ohio county Judge Lance Mason punched his wife 20 times, repeatedly slamming her head against his car's dashboard and breaking a bone in her skull — all of it in front of their children.

Michael Avenatti, the attorney for adult film star Stormy Daniels in her legal battles with President Trump, was arrested Wednesday following an allegation of domestic violence, according to the Los Angeles Police Department.

Avenatti, who has denied the allegation, was booked Wednesday afternoon after police took a report on Tuesday of the alleged incident. He was released on $50,000 bail.

Around the world, one in three women experiences domestic violence. How can it be reduced? New research is bringing unexpected insights into this problem — and its potential solutions.

A study accepted for publication this month by the Review of Economics and Statistics found that, in Bangladesh, improving the economic status of women can decrease domestic violence if the women also took part in an educational program that helped elevate their social standing in the community.

When Ohio State fired an assistant football coach last month after a 2015 domestic abuse allegation surfaced, head coach Urban Meyer said he and his staff knew nothing about it at the time. Now the school is looking into that.

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