domestic violence

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This is a bittersweet week for U.S. Attorney Trent Shores. He tendered his resignation effective February 28th to make way for President Joe Biden's new head prosecutor for the Northern District of Oklahoma. Over the last four years, he's worked closely with tribal and state leaders, as both adjust to last summer's landmark McGirt v. Oklahoma ruling.

The House Budget Committee has approved legislation advancing President Biden's $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief package, setting a path for intense debate in the Senate.

The legislation is set for a vote on the House floor at the end of the week. The Senate is then expected to take up the legislation and attempt to modify it to ensure it can pass procedural hurdles while still satisfying all 50 Senate Democrats.

Actress Evan Rachel Wood has identified Brian Warner, better known as the industrial-rock musician Marilyn Manson, as the abuser she had refrained from naming in previous testimony. In a statement posted to Instagram, the Westworld actor alleged that Warner, with whom she was in a relationship between 2007 and 2010, "started grooming me when I was a teenager and horrifically abused me for years. I was brainwashed and manipulated into submission. I am done living in fear of retaliation, slander, or blackmail."

Oklahoma Senate

The state Legislature’s session was badly disrupted last year by the pandemic. It’s back starting Monday, and faces a long list of pressing issues and unfinished work from 2020.

Jamie Glisson

"A Heavy Blow: The Pandemic's Impact on Domestic Violence," the second episode of the Focus: Black Oklahoma's special presentation "Black Plague: COVID In North Tulsa" is available now.

Jamie Glisson

This Sunday at 3 p.m., join KOSU for a special presentation of "Black Plague: COVID In North Tulsa" from Focus: Black Oklahoma.

The three-part series will focus on the effects of COVID-19 in the north Tulsa community. The episodes look at the pandemic's effect on youth, domestic violence, evictions and homelessness.

Allison Herrera / KOSU

The U.S. Attorneys of the Northern and Eastern District of Oklahoma announced a new pilot program on Monday to combat the ongoing problem of missing and murdered Indigenous people in Oklahoma.

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Oklahoma has one of the highest rates of domestic violence in the country -- more than 26,000 cases in 2019 alone according to the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation.

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On Saturday, President Donald Trump signed two bills into law to combat the problem of missing and murdered Indigenous people.

Savanna's Act and the Not Invisible Act were both were passed by Congress in September.

Last week, the House passed Savanna's Act, a bill that requires the Department of Justice to strengthen training, coordination, data collection and other guidelines related to cases of murdered or missing Native Americans. It aims to address the alarming number of cases involving Native women.

Former North Dakota Sen. Heidi Heitkamp first introduced the bill in 2017. It passed the Senate earlier this year and President Trump is expected to sign it into law.

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