DACA

Of the 690,000 undocumented immigrants now facing an uncertain future as Congress and President Trump wrangle over the DACA program are about 8,800 school teachers.

The real possibility that they'll be deported if the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program is allowed to expire has put enormous stress on them.

cole.house.gov

NPR's Scott Simon talks with Republican Rep. Tom Cole of Oklahoma about the government shutdown that began Saturday morning.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

The U.S. government is partly shut. The stroke of midnight came but no deal from Congress to keep the government open, prompting a shutdown on the first anniversary of the inauguration of President Donald Trump. The Senate is meeting to try again to reach a deal. The House met at 9. Before he headed to the Hill, Congressman Tom Cole, Republican of Oklahoma, joined us.

Congressman, thanks so much for being with us.

cole.house.gov

NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro talks to Republican Rep. Tom Cole of Oklahoma about the GOP's legislative agenda for 2018.

TRANSCRIPT:

LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

The DREAM Act has failed to pass when Democrats have held complete control of government; when Republicans have held all the cards; and in periods when the two parties have split control of the White House, Senate and House.

But lawmakers from both parties hope to secure permanent legal status for people protected by the expiring Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals , or DACA, program and they are trying to achieve some sort of solution over the next two weeks.

On the NPR Ed Team, I am what you might call the grizzled veteran. I've seen education trends come and go and come again. And go again.

You get the idea.

In years past, around December, my teammates would often pause by my desk and ask: "What do you think we'll be covering next year?"

I've always found this a fun thought exercise, and, at some point, my editor suggested I jot down my answers and share them beyond our cubicles. And so, here are a few predictions for 2018.

StateImpact Oklahoma

2017 is wrapping up, but the growing group of reporters at StateImpact are following many important government policy issues that will carry on into the new year.

Senior Reporter and Managing Editor Joe Wertz brought the StateImpact team into the studio for a preview of their coverage in the year to come. Here are some excerpts from the conversation edited for clarity:

HEALTH

Joe Wertz: Give me the big picture for the new year.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about a call by the House Majority Floor Leader for Republican Representatives to report to the State Capital to resume the special session this Monday afternoon, the State Supreme Court rejecting a portion of the 2013 Workers Compensation Overhaul removing benefits from workers who miss two or more medical appointments and Scott Pruitt gets criticized for spending nearly $15,000 in one days worth of air travel across Oklahoma.

Republicans who might have been leery of supporting the bipartisan Dream Act got a more conservative-friendly option this week in the form of a new bill dubbed the SUCCEED Act (Solution for Undocumented Children through Careers, Employment, Education and Defending our nation).

Many conservatives pundits and lawmakers were incensed that President Donald Trump appeared to make a deal with Democrats to enshrine into law the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program that shields many undocumented immigrants who were brought into the U.S. as children. To make matters worse for immigration hawks, Trump is also not requiring funding to build a wall along the Mexican border as a condition of the possible deal.

After learning that President Trump is working with Democratic congressional leaders on codifying the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, furious Trump supporters burned their Make America Great Again hats.

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