country music

About an hour outside of Nashville, in the hills of Middle Tennessee, you'll find a sprawling compound of cabins and farmhouses with red roofs; a place where horses run the pastures and mist tends to settle in the valleys between the hills. If it weren't for the work that happens here, this could be a vacation retreat for Nashville's entertainment industry – a getaway from the trappings of daily life, to disconnect and forget the world outside. But here, at OnSite Workshops, the idea isn't to leave your life behind, but to process everything that's happened in it.

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

This is FRESH AIR. I'm Terry Gross. In the new Ken Burns PBS series on the history of country music, my guest, Doug Green, talks about the era of the singing cowboy as epitomized by the most popular one, Gene Autry. Cowboy lore, folk ballads, jazz, Tin Pan Alley and Hollywood are all ingredients of the music of the singing cowboys who were movie staples in the '30s and '40s and then on TV in the '50s.

Country music has a gender problem. Women only make up 16% of country artists, and even fewer are songwriters.

When women do break into the mainstream — the likes of Carrie Underwood, Miranda Lambert, and Kacey Musgraves — they're often young. The average age of the genre's top female artists is 29 years old.

Director Ken Burns has told the story of America through the lens of the U.S. Civil War, baseball, jazz and the war in Vietnam. Now, he's telling it again through the soundtrack and the struggle of country music.

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Ken Burns 'Country Music' documentary premieres on PBS stations this Sunday at 7pm. And this summer, we've been asking listeners to tell us about a country song that made a big impact on their life.

We received hundred of responses, detailing childhood memories, first kisses, songs that made them think, and how hearing the music of folks like Garth Brooks and Willie Nelson helped them do an about-turn on country music.

Ken Burns is our great explainer, television's finest illustrator. He's a filmmaker who gives us what we know from fresh angles, so that we can learn more and appreciate topics on a deeper level. Whether his subject is the Civil War or baseball, Burns has made an art of divining what most Americans know about a subject and then putting an arm around our collective shoulder and murmuring, "Yes, but have you seen this?"

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If Sturgill Simpson seemed like an unlikely country star before — back when the Kentuckian was showcasing his rambl

When Rolling Stone surveyed the 100 greatest guitar players of all time in 2015, two women made the list: Bonnie Raitt at No. 89, Joni Mitchell at No. 75. Most guitar player lists fare worse for women; Joni makes it in around No. 50 maybe, but not always. Spin's 2012 list is slightly brighter: Nine spots out of 100 go to women, with Carrie Brownstein at No. 39 and PJ Harvey cresting at No. 27. But no other women break even the top 50, and not a single woman makes the top 25. Guitarworld's list of the Most Badass Guitar Players contains not a single female.

KOSU Radio will host three free screenings across the state of Ken Burns' new documentary Country Music, ahead of its September 15th premiere on PBS stations. This screening will provide an overview of the entire Country Music series, with a series of segments featuring stories about Hank Williams, Patsy Cline, Loretta Lynn, Vince Gill, Garth Brooks, and more.

Charley Crockett is a musician channeling an eclectic mix of blues, country, and gospel music. He will be touring through Tulsa on Saturday, June 29th at Cain's Ballroom. He released an album back in December 2018 and two songs earlier this year.

Matthew Viriyapah spoke to him over the phone while Crockett was still on the road in Tennessee. And it had been just a few days after he took the historic Grand Ole Opry stage for the first time.

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